Helpful for those seeking background about the movement directly from those involved and inspiring to those who wish to join...

Our Verdict

  • Our Verdict
  • GET IT

Google Rating

  • google rating
  • google rating
  • google rating
  • google rating
  • google rating
  • New York Times Bestseller

READ REVIEW

GLIMMER OF HOPE

HOW TRAGEDY SPARKED A MOVEMENT

Feb. 14, 2018, will go down as one of the most horrific days in U.S. history.

The murder of 17 students and teachers from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in a mass shooting by a former classmate sparked the March for Our Lives movement and nonprofit organization. As the survivors decided that #NeverAgain would they sit by while mass shootings happened in their country, they got to work controlling the narrative rather than allowing the story to be forgotten in the next news cycle. This volume, written by the student founders of March for Our Lives, includes poetry, personal essays, conversations, and excerpts from speeches that trace events from the immediate aftermath of the tragedy to the present day. Paragraphs at the beginning of each section introduce contributors and provide context. Ample color photographs illustrate the young people’s nationwide reach. The message of political activism is clearly repeated throughout the book, which ends on a note of hope with a list of 10 policy reforms, including funding research into gun violence as a public health matter and legislation around gun sales, trafficking, and technology. While the quality of the writing is variable, teen readers will recognize and respond to the sincere passion of the sentiments expressed.

Helpful for those seeking background about the movement directly from those involved and inspiring to those who wish to join their cause. (Nonfiction. 14-18)

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-984836-09-0

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Razorbill/Penguin

Review Posted Online: Sept. 2, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A powerful reminder of a history that is all too timely today.

THEY CALLED US ENEMY

A beautifully heart-wrenching graphic-novel adaptation of actor and activist Takei’s (Lions and Tigers and Bears, 2013, etc.) childhood experience of incarceration in a World War II camp for Japanese Americans.

Takei had not yet started school when he, his parents, and his younger siblings were forced to leave their home and report to the Santa Anita Racetrack for “processing and removal” due to President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066. The creators smoothly and cleverly embed the historical context within which Takei’s family’s story takes place, allowing readers to simultaneously experience the daily humiliations that they suffered in the camps while providing readers with a broader understanding of the federal legislation, lawsuits, and actions which led to and maintained this injustice. The heroes who fought against this and provided support to and within the Japanese American community, such as Fred Korematsu, the 442nd Regiment, Herbert Nicholson, and the ACLU’s Wayne Collins, are also highlighted, but the focus always remains on the many sacrifices that Takei’s parents made to ensure the safety and survival of their family while shielding their children from knowing the depths of the hatred they faced and danger they were in. The creators also highlight the dangerous parallels between the hate speech, stereotyping, and legislation used against Japanese Americans and the trajectory of current events. Delicate grayscale illustrations effectively convey the intense emotions and the stark living conditions.

A powerful reminder of a history that is all too timely today. (Graphic memoir. 14-adult)

Pub Date: July 16, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-60309-450-4

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Top Shelf Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 5, 2019

Did you like this book?

There are some funny moments, particularly in the simple black-and-white cartoons of a girl and boy that accompany the text...

HOW NOT TO BE A DICK

AN EVERYDAY ETIQUETTE GUIDE

Jokes about cheese logs abound in this humorous but sometimes-belabored etiquette guide ostensibly aimed at teens.

Following an introduction that defines what makes a person seem like a dick, seven chapters address situations ranging from initiating romantic relationships to behaving responsibly at after-office get-togethers. An uneasy line is straddled in terms of its intended age range. Readers are dutifully exhorted to make sure they wear proper attire to school dances: “Most schools have dress codes for dances. Read them carefully!” Yet there’s also advice on how to politely use a coffee shop as your office if you’re working from home. Further, a section on safety and manners at parties seems at times to employ the euphemistic term “sugary beverages” for alcohol and suggests “If you are buzzing on sugar or if someone spiked the punch, DO NOT DRIVE.” This cagey approach to the topic of teen drinking is confusing at best and at worst, may strike readers as condescending.

There are some funny moments, particularly in the simple black-and-white cartoons of a girl and boy that accompany the text throughout. However, as etiquette goes, there’s not much that is new here and a real question of whom this is for. (Nonfiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-936976-02-7

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Zest Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 14, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2013

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more