Fasten your seat belts and sit back and relax; this clever book should fly off the shelves.

READ REVIEW

FLIGHT 1-2-3

Get ready for takeoff and some counting fun.

This charming companion to Backseat A-B-See (2012) uses a counting concept to describe the phases of preparation for an airplane trip. A family of three with a boy wearing a yellow cap provides a narrative throughline for readers. “When taking a flight, what do you see? / 1 Airport / 2 Luggage carts / 3 Check-in desks” and so on, including escalators, trash cans and security officers. Following 10 gates are 100 fastened seat belts, 2,000 miles (3,200 kilometers), 33,000 feet (10,000 meters), a “million places to explore”—and “[o]ne happy meeting.” The digital illustrations depict the scenes with graphic shapes, universal signs and simplified white silhouettes similar to those seen on restroom signs for people; only the protagonist family and some key figures such as airline personnel are given any individuality at all. Humorous, graphically clever details abound. The trash cans are seen in cross section, filled with illegal items such as water bottles, scissors and baseball bats. Eight men and nine women line up across the spread from left to right waiting to get into their respective restrooms; the boy stands with his legs crossed. Informative as well as reassuring, this is ideal for prepping kids for their first flight (and maybe adults as well).

Fasten your seat belts and sit back and relax; this clever book should fly off the shelves. (Informational picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: April 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4521-1662-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review Posted Online: Feb. 27, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2013

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A sweet reminder that it’s easy to weather a storm with the company and kindness of friends.

GOOD NIGHT, LITTLE BLUE TRUCK

Is it a stormy-night scare or a bedtime book? Both!

Little Blue Truck and his good friend Toad are heading home when a storm lets loose. Before long, their familiar, now very nervous barnyard friends (Goat, Hen, Goose, Cow, Duck, and Pig) squeeze into the garage. Blue explains that “clouds bump and tumble in the sky, / but here inside we’re warm and dry, / and all the thirsty plants below / will get a drink to help them grow!” The friends begin to relax. “Duck said, loud as he could quack it, / ‘THUNDER’S JUST A NOISY RACKET!’ ” In the quiet after the storm, the barnyard friends are sleepy, but the garage is not their home. “ ‘Beep!’ said Blue. ‘Just hop inside. / All aboard for the bedtime ride!’ ” Young readers will settle down for their own bedtimes as Blue and Toad drop each friend at home and bid them a good night before returning to the garage and their own beds. “Blue gave one small sleepy ‘Beep.’ / Then Little Blue Truck fell fast asleep.” Joseph’s rich nighttime-blue illustrations (done “in the style of [series co-creator] Jill McElmurry”) highlight the power of the storm and capture the still serenity that follows. Little Blue Truck has been chugging along since 2008, but there seems to be plenty of gas left in the tank.

A sweet reminder that it’s easy to weather a storm with the company and kindness of friends. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 22, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-328-85213-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: June 23, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2019

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Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it.

YOUR BABY'S FIRST WORD WILL BE DADA

A succession of animal dads do their best to teach their young to say “Dada” in this picture-book vehicle for Fallon.

A grumpy bull says, “DADA!”; his calf moos back. A sad-looking ram insists, “DADA!”; his lamb baas back. A duck, a bee, a dog, a rabbit, a cat, a mouse, a donkey, a pig, a frog, a rooster, and a horse all fail similarly, spread by spread. A final two-spread sequence finds all of the animals arrayed across the pages, dads on the verso and children on the recto. All the text prior to this point has been either iterations of “Dada” or animal sounds in dialogue bubbles; here, narrative text states, “Now everybody get in line, let’s say it together one more time….” Upon the turn of the page, the animal dads gaze round-eyed as their young across the gutter all cry, “DADA!” (except the duckling, who says, “quack”). Ordóñez's illustrations have a bland, digital look, compositions hardly varying with the characters, although the pastel-colored backgrounds change. The punch line fails from a design standpoint, as the sudden, single-bubble chorus of “DADA” appears to be emanating from background features rather than the baby animals’ mouths (only some of which, on close inspection, appear to be open). It also fails to be funny.

Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: June 9, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-250-00934-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

Review Posted Online: April 15, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2015

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