THE SCAR-CROW MEN by Mark Chadbourn

THE SCAR-CROW MEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Addition to Chadbourn's dark historical fantasy series (following The Silver Skull, 2009) set in the waning years of England's Elizabethan age.

In 1593, the Black Death stalks London's fetid streets, while suitably dark intrigues swirl about England's spymasters. Following the death of spymaster-in-chief Sir Francis Walsingham, Will Swyfte, "England's greatest spy," reports to Sir Robert Cecil. Unfortunately, Cecil, preoccupied with personal prestige and defeating the contrivances of the Earl of Essex's rival spy network, refuses to listen to Will's terrible news. English spies—an overabundance of spies indeed—are being murdered in ritual fashion consistent with some deeply hidden strategy of the Unseelie Court: the Fay with all their evil magic are about to spring a trap to engulf not just England but all of Europe. Having uncovered the details, Christopher Marlowe, playwright, spy and Will's greatest friend, hides in fear of his life, not daring to appear even for the first performance of his latest play, Dr. Faustus. Indeed, during the performance, somebody summons a devil that clamps itself to Will's psyche. When Marlowe is found murdered in a gambling den, Will, with few allies, must join forces with the spirited but treacherous Irish spy Meg O'Shee, the exiled magician Dr. John Dee and a mysterious cabal of plotters that calls itself the School of Night. While individual scenes are often memorable, the characters are not, and the overall design sinks beneath the smothering weight of detail and improbably tortuous plotting. The lack of originality doesn't help.

So much happens to so little effect that none of it really matters.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 2011
ISBN: 978-1-61614-254-4
Page count: 408pp
Publisher: Pyr/Prometheus Books
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1st, 2011