EXPLORING THE SOLAR SYSTEM

A HISTORY WITH 22 ACTIVITIES

Combining specific but not heavily technical descriptions with plenty of bright, sharply reproduced color photos, this outstanding up-to-the-minute-and-beyond account of our ages-old study of the solar system will sweep readers up in the wonder and excitement of each new discovery. Writing with Joy Hakim–like vigor—“Copernicus decided that Ptolemy’s system was too ridiculously complicated to be true”—Carson opens with ancient views of the heavens’ five “wandering stars.” She closes with a quick-facts “Field Guide to the Solar System” and in between follows the development of early modern astronomy, traces the international space effort decade by decade and finally looks to upcoming space missions planned for the next decade or so. She also introduces scientists of the past and present (asking many of the latter what first sparked their interest in space), and offers nearly two dozen inexpensive projects or activities. By far the most complete, current and evenhanded look at the space program’s successes and failures for younger audiences, this meaty, compelling invitation to explore the high frontier will soar off shelves. (multimedia resource lists, index) (Nonfiction. 11-13)

Pub Date: April 1, 2006

ISBN: 1-55652-593-1

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2006

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BRIAN'S RETURN

Paulsen brings the story he began in Hatchet (1987) and continued in the alternate sequels The River (1991) and Brian’s Winter (1996) around to a sometimes-mystical close. Surviving the media coverage and the unwanted attention of other high school students has become more onerous to Brian than his experiences in the wild; realizing that the wilderness has become larger within him than the need to be with people, Brian methodically gathers survival equipment—listed in detail—then leaves his old life behind. It takes some time, plus a brutal fight and sessions with a savvy counselor, before Brian reaches that realization, but once out under the trees, it’s obvious that his attachment to the wild is a permanent one. Becoming ever more attuned to the natural wonders around him, he travels over a succession of lakes and streams, pausing to make camp, howl with a wolf, read Shakespeare to a pair of attentive otters and, once, to share a meal with an old man who talks about animal guides and leaves a medicine bundle for him. Readers hoping for the high adventure of the previous books may be disappointed, as Brian is now so skilled that a tipped canoe or a wild storm are only inconveniences, and even bears more hazard than threat; still, Paulsen bases many of his protagonist’s experiences on his own, and the wilderness through which Brian moves is vividly observed. Afterword. (Fiction. 11-13)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-385-32500-2

Page Count: 116

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 1998

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Far from comprehensive but visually arresting and, at times, provocative.

HUMAN BODY

From the Information Graphics series

Stylized graphics rendered in saturated hues set this quick overview of body systems apart from the general run.

Arranged in tabbed and color-coded sections, the tour covers familiar ground but often from an unusual angle. The tally of human senses at the beginning, for instance, includes “proprioception” (physical multitasking), and ensuing chapters on the skeletal, circulatory and other systems are capped with a miscellany of body contents and products—from selected parasites and chemicals to farts and sweat. Likewise, descriptions of a dozen physical components of the “Brain Box” are followed by notes on more slippery mental functions like “Consciousness” and “Imagination.” The facts and observations gathered by Rogers are presented as labels or captions. They are interspersed on each spread with flat, eye-dazzling images designed by Grundy not with anatomical correctness in mind but to show processes or relationships at a glance. Thus, to show body parts most sensitive to touch, a silhouette figure sports an oversized hand and foot, plus Homer Simpson lips (though genitals are absent, which seems overcautious as an explicit section on reproduction follows a few pages later), and a stack of bathtubs illustrates the quantity of urine the average adult produces in an average lifetime (385 bathtubs’ worth). There is no backmatter.

Far from comprehensive but visually arresting and, at times, provocative. (Nonfiction. 11-13)

Pub Date: Aug. 26, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-7636-7123-5

Page Count: 80

Publisher: Big Picture/Candlewick

Review Posted Online: April 30, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2014

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