Endlessly fascinating and a sharing opportunity for children and adults who love the game.

THE WORLD SERIES

BASEBALL'S BIGGEST STAGE

From the Spectacular Sports series

A condensed history of the World Series is filled with information and selected highlights.

Although there had been a series in 1903, the first officially recognized World Series occurred in 1905, in the early years of what is considered the modern age of baseball. Since then, there have been thrills and spectacles, heroes and goats, and games that have reverberated through the years in memory and controversy. Doeden presents the Fall Classic’s basic history as well as chapters spotlighting special games, players and individual moments, balancing long-ago events and players with those of recent years. All of them are interesting and informative, but no criteria are given concerning the selections. Every fan will find some favorites and also experience disappointment that some special ones are left out. A final chapter speculates on the future of the World Series and of baseball itself. Text is composed in accessible, conversational language and carefully arranged with clear headings in red display type announcing the player or the date and the teams involved, all augmented by period action photos and statistics. There are also sidebars, framed on a grass-green field, offering further information about the dead ball era, the Commissioner’s Trophy, Shoeless Joe Jackson, the Curse of the Bambino and more.

Endlessly fascinating and a sharing opportunity for children and adults who love the game. (statistics, source notes, glossary, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10-16)

Pub Date: March 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4677-1896-7

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Millbrook/Lerner

Review Posted Online: Jan. 22, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2014

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During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money...

QUEENS OF THE ICE

In the 1930s, the Canadian female ice-hockey team called the Rivulettes dominated the ice.

During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money to play. From 1931-1940, the Preston Rivulettes, led by Hilda Ranscome, overwhelmed all other teams, capturing the national title in the four years that they could afford to travel far enough to compete for it. With the pressure of the war, and because they were no longer capturing fan enthusiasm since they always won, the Rivulettes disbanded in 1942. After the war, the culture had changed, and women’s ice hockey nearly disappeared until a recent rebirth. This effort describes in detail many of the key games the team played over that decade and the way that their remarkable record has been largely ignored by the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. Though the book effectively captures the scrappy nature of the games (with numerous penalties in each for high sticking and fighting), disappointingly, it lacks any significant biographical information on team members. Only a couple are very briefly sketched. Readers will wonder what made this team so great; more information about the players might have provided key insights.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-55277-721-3

Page Count: 136

Publisher: James Lorimer

Review Posted Online: July 20, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2011

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DANCING WHEELS

A stereotype about people with disabilities is shattered by this introduction to a dance company known as Dancing Wheels, a group composed of “sit down” and “stand-up” dancers. The story begins with Mary Fletcher-Verdi, born with spina bifida, a condition that causes weakness in the legs and spine. Mary always wanted to dance, and, encouraged by a family who focused on what she could do rather than what she couldn’t, she studied the art and eventually formed a mixed company, some who dance on their legs, and some who dance in wheelchairs. What she accomplished can be seen in this photo journal of the group’s dance workshop in which beginners and experienced dancers study and rehearse. Along the way, McMahon (One Belfast Boy, 1999, etc.) intersperses the history of the group, some details about the dancers, their families, and the rehearsal process that leads up to the final performance. Three children are featured, Jenny a wheelchair dancer, Devin, her stand-up partner, and Sabatino, the young son of Mary’s partner. The focus on these youngsters gives the reader a sense of their personalities and their lives with their families. Godt’s (Listen for the Bus, not reviewed, etc.) color photographs detail every aspect of the story and show the dancers at home and in rehearsal, interacting with each other, having fun, and finally performaning. They convey the dancer’s sense of joy as well as the commitment to the dance as an art form felt by the adult directors and teachers. An excellent book for helping children and adults expand their understanding about the abilities of the “disabled.” (Nonfiction. 7-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2000

ISBN: 0-395-88889-1

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2000

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