FAITH

This impeccably designed introduction to spiritual practices around the world provides a superb way to show children that there are many means of expressing religious faith. The authors concentrate on what people of disparate faiths have in common by focusing on the mutual “elements of faith” that most religions share, such as praying, reading holy books, participating in cleansing rituals, visiting holy places and helping others. The exceptionally thoughtful design uses just a few sentences of text set in large type against backgrounds of deep, saturated color. Each spread shows multiple photographs of children from many different cultures engaging in their own religious activities, with simple captions identifying the activity and the particular country and/or faith. Noteworthy care was taken in the choice of engaging, nonstereotypical and inclusive photographs, and the quality of the photography and reproduction is stellar. The concluding pages include an amplified text describing the elements of faith in more detail, a world map showing all the countries noted in the photo captions and a glossary of religious terms. This introduction to world religions deserves a wide audience. (Picture book/religion. 3-10)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-1-58089-177-6

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Charlesbridge

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2009

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A delightful celebration.

YOUR NAME IS A SONG

A girl learns to appreciate her long name and the diverse names of others.

A Black child wearing cornrows braided into an afro puff watches her classmates in the schoolyard playing handball. Momma arrives, wearing a bright headwrap, and asks about her first day of school. The girl is upset because no one could say her name—not even the teacher. Reflecting the title, Momma tells her to tell her teacher her name is a song. As they walk through the streets, swaying and dancing to the sounds of street musicians and music from cars, Momma sings names from many different cultures. (Each name is spelled phonetically in parentheses for ease of caregivers reading aloud.) The next day, “the girl didn’t want to go to school, but she had songs to teach.” She even shows her teacher that “Miss Anderson” is a song. This lovely celebration of African American culture, featuring a Muslim family, offers a fresh way to look at the tradition of creating new names; Momma says, “Made-up names come from dreamers. Their real names were stolen long ago so they dream up new ones. They make a way out of no way, make names out of no names—pull them from the sky!” A glossary notes the origins and meanings of the names included in the text, with a note to always listen closely to how a person pronounces their name. The dynamic, pastel-hued illustrations reflect energy and strength.

A delightful celebration. (Picture book. 5-10)

Pub Date: July 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-943147-72-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: The Innovation Press

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2020

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HOW CHIPMUNK GOT HIS STRIPES

A TALE OF BRAGGING AND TEASING

Noted storyteller Bruchac (Squanto’s Journey: The Story of the First Thanksgiving, p. 1498, etc.) teams up with his son, James (Native American Games and Stories, not reviewed) to present a pourquoi tale from the East Coast Native American tradition. Bear is undeniably big; he is also a braggart, given to walking through the forest and proclaiming his superiority to all within earshot: “I can do anything! Yes, I can!” When he hears this, little Brown Squirrel challenges Bear to tell the sun not to rise the next day. This Bear does, and when the sun does in fact rise despite his injunction not to, Brown Squirrel unwisely gloats: “Bear is foolish, the sun came up. Bear is silly, the sun came up.” Thanks to trickery, Brown Squirrel escapes with his life, but not before Bear claws the stripes into his back that cause him to change his name to Chipmunk. The Bruchacs translate the orality of the tale to written text beautifully, including dialogue that invites audience participation. Aruego and Dewey’s (Mouse in Love, p. 886, etc.) signature cartoon-like illustrations extend the humor of the text perfectly. One spread shows the faces of all the animals rejoicing in the yellow light of the newly risen sun—all except Bear, whose glower contrasts ominously with Brown Squirrel’s glee. Clever use of perspective emphasizes the difference in size between boastful Bear and his pint-sized trickster opponent. Authors’ notes precede the story, explaining the history of the tale and each teller’s relationship to it. A winner. (Picture book/folktale. 4-8)

Pub Date: March 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-8037-2404-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2000

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