A cheerful but uneven celebration of music with simple vocabulary and repeated phrases.

MAYA PLAYS THE PIANO

A young girl takes her first piano lesson in this rhyming picture-book sequel.

Three-year-old Maya walks with her family to piano lessons, where teacher Miss Corrie introduces middle C. Maya is fascinated by the instrument: “Excited! / Maya, really wanted to learn. / She could not wait / Until her turn.” When Maya gets up to the piano, she sees a bumblebee sticker on the middle C. She pushes the key and makes up a song, which she sings and practices at home, entertaining her whole family. The rhymes by the author, who uses the pen name Maya and Jello, scan well, especially when emphasis is added (“en-TRANC-ing”). The frequent refrain of Maya’s song, which has basic, repetitive lyrics, will allow lap readers to chime in and say the words. But the lyrics, which are about not touching middle C, seem to contradict the story, in which Maya plays the note with gusto. Gustyawan’s digital cartoon illustrations feature a wonderfully expressive Maya and expand the cast to include the brown-skinned Miss Corrie and two pale-skinned piano students. (Maya and her family have brown skin and dark curly hair.) Single page images pair with text-only pages featuring a dark background, white text, and a one-color highlight or rainbow music notes.

A cheerful but uneven celebration of music with simple vocabulary and repeated phrases.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 39

Publisher: M&J Literary Works Inc

Review Posted Online: Oct. 19, 2020

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The snappy text will get toes tapping, but the information it carries is limited.

LET'S DANCE!

Dancing is one of the most universal elements of cultures the world over.

In onomatopoeic, rhyming text, Bolling encourages readers to dance in styles including folk dance, classical ballet, breakdancing, and line dancing. Read aloud, the zippy text will engage young children: “Tappity Tap / Fingers Snap,” reads the rhyme on the double-page spread for flamenco; “Jiggity-Jig / Zig-zag-zig” describes Irish step dancing. The ballet pages stereotypically include only children in dresses or tutus, but one of these dancers wears hijab. Overall, children included are racially diverse and vary in gender presentation. Diaz’s illustrations show her background in animated films; her active child dancers generally have the large-eyed sameness of cartoon characters. The endpapers, with shoes and musical instruments, could become a matching game with pages in the book. The dances depicted are described at the end, including kathak from India and kuku from Guinea, West Africa. Unfortunately, these explanations are quite rudimentary. Kathak dancers use their facial expressions extensively in addition to the “movements of their hands and their jingling feet,” as described in the book. Although today kuku is danced at all types of celebrations in several countries, it was once done after fishing, an activity acknowledged in the illustrations but not mentioned in the explanatory text.

The snappy text will get toes tapping, but the information it carries is limited. (Informational picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: March 3, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-63592-142-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Boyds Mills

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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While there are many rhyming truck books out there, this stands out for being a collection of poems.

DIGGER, DOZER, DUMPER

Rhyming poems introduce children to anthropomorphized trucks of all sorts, as well as the jobs that they do.

Adorable multiethnic children are the drivers of these 16 trucks—from construction equipment to city trucks, rescue vehicles and a semi—easily standing in for readers, a point made very clear on the final spread. Varying rhyme schemes and poem lengths help keep readers’ attention. For the most part, the rhymes and rhythms work, as in this, from “Cement Mixer”: “No time to wait; / he can’t sit still. / He has to beg your pardon. / For if he dawdles on the way, / his slushy load will harden.” Slonim’s trucks each sport an expressive pair of eyes, but the anthropomorphism stops there, at least in the pictures—Vestergaard sometimes takes it too far, as in “Bulldozer”: “He’s not a bully, either, / although he’s big and tough. / He waits his turn, plays well with friends, / and pushes just enough.” A few trucks’ jobs get short shrift, to mixed effect: “Skid-Steer Loader” focuses on how this truck moves without the typical steering wheel, but “Semi” runs with a royalty analogy and fails to truly impart any knowledge. The acrylic-and-charcoal artwork, set against white backgrounds, keeps the focus on the trucks and the jobs they are doing.

While there are many rhyming truck books out there, this stands out for being a collection of poems. (Picture book/poetry. 3-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 27, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-7636-5078-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 29, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2013

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