OTHER EVER AFTERS

NEW QUEER FAIRY TALES

Fresh and exciting; sure to delight and surprise.

Happily-ever-after has no predictable formula for these protagonists.

In the king’s forest, a young ranger is charged with protecting the magical flowers. When a flower thief shows the ranger that any picked flowers will be replaced by two more the next day, the ranger begins to question the king’s edict. In another kingdom, a princess tries to woo an uninterested goose girl, promising more and more rewards in exchange for accepting the marriage proposal. With each refusal, the princess grows angrier and more confused. In a village far away, a child enlists their grandmother’s help in burning away their old name, but the ritual is interrupted by their grandfather’s death, and their old name returns to haunt them. The men of another village sacrifice a woman to the Giantess every year, but the latest sacrifice discovers things may not be as they seem. These stories and more are told through enchanting full-color art whose sweet, pastel shades and soft lines belie the powerful punch the stories convey. Each narrative is self-contained and perfect for reading either individually or in one fully engrossed sitting. Gillman subverts the traditional fairy-tale format in an evolution of the genre that does not feel out of place alongside the classics. Characters present as diverse in race, sexuality, and gender expression.

Fresh and exciting; sure to delight and surprise. (Graphic fiction. 12-17)

Pub Date: Sept. 20, 2022

ISBN: 978-0-593-30319-1

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Random House Graphic

Review Posted Online: June 7, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2022

THE FIELD GUIDE TO THE NORTH AMERICAN TEENAGER

Despite some missteps, this will appeal to readers who enjoy a fresh and realistic teen voice.

A teenage, not-so-lonely loner endures the wilds of high school in Austin, Texas.

Norris Kaplan, the protagonist of Philippe’s debut novel, is a hypersweaty, uber-snarky black, Haitian, French-Canadian pushing to survive life in his new school. His professor mom’s new tenure-track job transplants Norris mid–school year, and his biting wit and sarcasm are exposed through his cataloging of his new world in a field guide–style burn book. He’s greeted in his new life by an assortment of acquaintances, Liam, who is white and struggling with depression; Maddie, a self-sacrificing white cheerleader with a heart of gold; and Aarti, his Indian-American love interest who offers connection. Norris’ ego, fueled by his insecurities, often gets in the way of meaningful character development. The scenes showcasing his emotional growth are too brief and, despite foreshadowing, the climax falls flat because he still gets incredible personal access to people he’s hurt. A scene where Norris is confronted by his mother for getting drunk and belligerent with a white cop is diluted by his refusal or inability to grasp the severity of the situation and the resultant minor consequences. The humor is spot-on, as is the representation of the black diaspora; the opportunity for broader conversations about other topics is there, however, the uneven buildup of detailed, meaningful exchanges and the glibness of Norris’ voice detract.

Despite some missteps, this will appeal to readers who enjoy a fresh and realistic teen voice. (Fiction. 13-16)

Pub Date: Jan. 8, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-06-282411-0

Page Count: 384

Publisher: Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Oct. 14, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2018

DEAD WEDNESDAY

Characters to love, quips to snort at, insights to ponder: typical Spinelli.

For two teenagers, a small town’s annual cautionary ritual becomes both a life- and a death-changing experience.

On the second Wednesday in June, every eighth grader in Amber Springs, Pennsylvania, gets a black shirt, the name and picture of a teen killed the previous year through reckless behavior—and the silent treatment from everyone in town. Like many of his classmates, shy, self-conscious Robbie “Worm” Tarnauer has been looking forward to Dead Wed as a day for cutting loose rather than sober reflection…until he finds himself talking to a strange girl or, as she would have it, “spectral maiden,” only he can see or touch. Becca Finch is as surprised and confused as Worm, only remembering losing control of her car on an icy slope that past Christmas Eve. But being (or having been, anyway) a more outgoing sort, she sees their encounter as a sign that she’s got a mission. What follows, in a long conversational ramble through town and beyond, is a day at once ordinary yet rich in discovery and self-discovery—not just for Worm, but for Becca too, with a climactic twist that leaves both ready, or readier, for whatever may come next. Spinelli shines at setting a tongue-in-cheek tone for a tale with serious underpinnings, and as in Stargirl (2000), readers will be swept into the relationship that develops between this adolescent odd couple. Characters follow a White default.

Characters to love, quips to snort at, insights to ponder: typical Spinelli. (Fiction. 12-15)

Pub Date: Aug. 3, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-593-30667-3

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 31, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2021

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