PREMIERE

ON THE RUNWAY, BOOK #1

In this not-so-frothy Christian chick-lit novel, two sisters, one a fashion-savvy clotheshorse who is beautiful, self-possessed and glib, the other a pretty, smart, sensible and low-key person, are hired to co-host a TV show about the world of fashion. The story is told in the first person from the point of view of Erin, the younger and more religious sister, who, in an understandable brew of sisterly feelings, loves, envies, admires and is annoyed by the more outgoing and (slightly) wilder Paige. In a public-relations ploy, the girls are invited to be guests on a reality-TV show, similar to MTV’s Real World, where they encounter a universe of moral and emotional ambiguity, a place where it’s hard to tell who is having real feelings and who is acting like it for the cameras. This is the most engaging part of this rather bland tale, as it gives the girls, and thus readers, a chance to see how reality TV goes about the business of manipulating its so-called actors for mass entertainment. Serviceable, but not much more. (Fiction. YA)

Pub Date: June 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-310-71786-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Zondervan

Review Posted Online: June 3, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2010

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Great worldbuilding but not entirely satisfying.

STAR DAUGHTER

When half-star/half-human Sheetal Mistry accidently injures her father, she needs to ascend to Svargalok, the abode of the stars, to find him a cure.

Just shy of 17, Sheetal has brown skin like her human father, Gautam, and silver hair like her star mother, Charumati, but she has never truly known what it means to be a star. Her human, Gujarati family in New Jersey insists she hide her star heredity, as stars were once hunted by mortals for their silver blood, which has healing properties. As a result, Sheetal knows very little of her ancestry or what she is truly capable of. Following the accident that puts her father in the hospital, Sheetal and her best friend, Minal, go in search of Charumati for a drop of star’s blood to cure her father. Unfortunately for her, Nana and Nani—the Esteemed Patriarch and Matriarch of their constellation, Pushya, and Sheetal’s maternal grandparents—agree to save her father only if she wins a competition that will allow their family to rule over the other constellations. Loosely inspired by Neil Gaiman’s Stardust (1997) and Hindu mythology, Thakrar’s debut covers the lives of stars, an unnecessarily complicated romance, and a half-star’s journey toward self-discovery. Refreshingly, all the characters are Indian or of Indian origin. Despite the fascinating premise, however, several characters lack the luster and conviction which would have otherwise added much-needed depth and heart to the novel.

Great worldbuilding but not entirely satisfying.  (Fantasy. 14-18)

Pub Date: Aug. 11, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-289462-5

Page Count: 448

Publisher: HarperTeen

Review Posted Online: May 16, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2020

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Evil that is impossibly difficult to comprehend and filled with word-images that will leave readers gasping. The author’s...

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WHAT THE NIGHT SINGS

Gerta didn’t know she was Jewish until she and her father were taken for transport by the Nazis.

When Bergen-Belsen is liberated, Gerta and the other survivors are ill, skeletal, dying, or sunk in madness, and they have no homes to which they can return. Relating the events that led her there, she tells of a seemingly carefree life in Würzburg with her musician father and German gentile stepmother, an opera singer who is also Gerta’s voice teacher. But they were living with false identification papers, and their lives become ever more withdrawn. She has fleeting visions of her early childhood in Köln, of her mother, and of Kristallnacht. The cattle-car journey to Theresienstadt is only the beginning of days, weeks, months, years filled with unspeakable horrors in the “intricacies of the Nazi web…the animalization of human souls.” Then comes Auschwitz, where her father is gassed, then Bergen-Belsen, typhus, and, finally, a kind of awakening to her own humanity. Later she covertly enters British-occupied Palestine, Eratz Yisrael, and builds a life there. Stamper spares readers nothing. Everything that Gerta witnesses or experiences really happened in the hell that was the Holocaust, including the further humiliations in its aftermath, a rarely told part of the story. The text is on pale, sepia-toned paper with dark, eerie illustrations in the same tones, reminiscent of real drawings produced by camp inmates.

Evil that is impossibly difficult to comprehend and filled with word-images that will leave readers gasping. The author’s dedication says it all, in both Hebrew and English: “Remember.” (author’s note, map, glossary, resources, acknowledgments; not seen) (Historical fiction. 14-adult)

Pub Date: Feb. 20, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5247-0038-6

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2017

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