Smart, sassy, supportive girl power to the max! (Picture book. 3-6)

COOKIE & MILK

A SCIENTIFICALLY STUNT-TASTIC SISTERHOOD

It can be hard to make friends when your personalities clash.

McAvoy’s friendship tale features two girls who recount how they learned to be friends and bonded over their personality differences. Cookie is a brown girl who loves science, and Milk is a white girl who loves sports. The girls banter back and forth, recalling how they discovered they have fun playing together—especially when they use their complementary personalities to accomplish something awesome! If Milk wants to skate, then Cookie is in the background helping her reach her fullest potential by building a ramp, for instance. Throughout the book, early readers will love guessing what Milk’s younger brother is trying to communicate (he also slyly breaks the fourth wall) when he introduces fans to exciting new science words such as “engine’s ear!”—er, “engineer.” Caregivers will also find helpful starter questions to ask when exploring differences with their kids. Those questions provide a framework within which young readers may learn to value and accept differences in themselves and others. Even after the story, readers are provided with a list of powerhouse women who were either “smart” or “sporty,” and a glossary of words encourages supportive friendships. Gibson’s simple, cartoon illustrations playfully remind girls that there are universal commonalities in sisterhood.

Smart, sassy, supportive girl power to the max! (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-9976085-8-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Cardinal Rule Press

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2019

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A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together.

HEY, DUCK!

A clueless duckling tries to make a new friend.

He is confused by this peculiar-looking duck, who has a long tail, doesn’t waddle and likes to be alone. No matter how explicitly the creature denies he is a duck and announces that he is a cat, the duckling refuses to acknowledge the facts.  When this creature expresses complete lack of interest in playing puddle stomp, the little ducking goes off and plays on his own. But the cat is not without remorse for rejecting an offered friendship. Of course it all ends happily, with the two new friends enjoying each other’s company. Bramsen employs brief sentences and the simplest of rhymes to tell this slight tale. The two heroes are meticulously drawn with endearing, expressive faces and body language, and their feathers and fur appear textured and touchable. Even the detailed tree bark and grass seem three-dimensional. There are single- and double-page spreads, panels surrounded by white space and circular and oval frames, all in a variety of eye-pleasing juxtapositions. While the initial appeal is solidly visual, young readers will get the gentle message that friendship is not something to take for granted but is to be embraced with open arms—or paws and webbed feet.

A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 22, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-375-86990-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Nov. 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2012

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A TREE IS NICE

A nursery school approach to a general concept. "A tree is nice"- Why? Because..."We can climb the tree...play pirate ship...pick the apples...build playhouses out of the leaves. A tree is nice to hang a swing in...Birds build nests in trees... Sticks come off trees...People have picnics there too"...etc. etc. One follows the give and take of a shared succession of reactions to what a tree- or trees- can mean. There is a kind of poetic simplicity that is innate in small children. Marc Simont has made the pictures, half in full color, and they too have a childlike directness (with an underlying sophistication that adults will recognize). Not a book for everyone -but those who like it will like it immensely. The format (6 x 11) makes it a difficult book for shelving, so put it in the "clean hands" section of flat books. Here's your first book for Arbor Day use- a good spring and summer item.

Pub Date: June 15, 1956

ISBN: 978-0-06-443147-7

Page Count: 36

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: July 17, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1956

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