SUPERMOM

A playful tale offering readers a peek at moms across the species. Supermom is a wonder to behold: she propagates her species, plays the greatest games, protects, and nurtures her young. The main text comments on the general theme of each page—playing, communicating, defending—while the subtext, set in a bolder typeface, provides captions for the illustrations of different creatures. Moms of all types are celebrated: human, animal, and insect mothers alike receive accolades. While the book does not provide an in-depth, scientific approach to the mothering habits of various animals, it does offer readers intriguing tidbits of animal-mom trivia. However, Manning's scope proves to be too broad; his attempts to establish connections among all mothers result in a few glaring missteps in the text, limiting its appeal. The assertion that "We call the person who gave birth to us 'mom.' We call the grownup who takes care of us 'mom,' too" is not applicable (and more than a little misleading) for the large number of children in daycare or those who stay at home with their fathers, grandparents, or other relatives. Furthermore, to say that all moms are "supermoms" and therefore gentle, nurturing, cuddly, etc., is simply wishful thinking. Ganström's full-color illustrations highlight a nice variety of moms busily mothering, be it a bear cuddling her young cub, or a wolf frolicking with her pups. Each two-page spread features moms of different species engaged in similar activities, establishing, with more success than the text, a clearer connection between these seemingly disparate mothers. A clever concept supported by appealing illustrations that sadly falls short of the mark. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: March 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-8075-7666-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2001

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Sincere and wholehearted.

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I PROMISE

The NBA star offers a poem that encourages curiosity, integrity, compassion, courage, and self-forgiveness.

James makes his debut as a children’s author with a motivational poem touting life habits that children should strive for. In the first-person narration, he provides young readers with foundational self-esteem encouragement layered within basketball descriptions: “I promise to run full court and show up each time / to get right back up and let my magic shine.” While the verse is nothing particularly artful, it is heartfelt, and in her illustrations, Mata offers attention-grabbing illustrations of a diverse and enthusiastic group of children. Scenes vary, including classrooms hung with student artwork, an asphalt playground where kids jump double Dutch, and a gym populated with pint-sized basketball players, all clearly part of one bustling neighborhood. Her artistry brings black and brown joy to the forefront of each page. These children evince equal joy in learning and in play. One particularly touching double-page spread depicts two vignettes of a pair of black children, possibly siblings; in one, they cuddle comfortably together, and in the other, the older gives the younger a playful noogie. Adults will appreciate the closing checklist of promises, which emphasize active engagement with school. A closing note very generally introduces principles that underlie the Lebron James Family Foundation’s I Promise School (in Akron, Ohio). (This book was reviewed digitally with 10-by-20-inch double-page spreads viewed at 15% of actual size.)

Sincere and wholehearted. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 11, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-297106-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2020

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The tips garnered here could be used to scare just about anyone, and for those scared of ghosts, at least your carpets will...

HOW TO SCARE A GHOST

From the How To... series

Reagan and Wildish continue their How to… series with this Halloween-themed title.

If you’ve ever had a hankering to scare a ghost, this handbook is what you need. In it, a pair of siblings shows readers “how to attract a ghost” (they like creepily carved pumpkins and glitter), identify a ghost (real ghosts “never, ever open doors”), and scare a ghost (making faces, telling scary stories). Also included is a warning not to go too far—a vacuum is over-the-top on the scary chart for ghosts. Once you’ve calmed your ghost again, it’s time to play (just not hide-and-seek or on a trampoline) and then decide on costumes for trick-or-treating. Your ghost will also need to learn Halloween etiquette (knocking instead of floating through doors). The title seems a little misleading considering only two spreads are dedicated to trying to scare a ghost, but the package as a whole is entertaining. Wildish’s digital cartoon illustrations are as bright as ever, and the brother and sister duo have especially expressive faces. Both are white-presenting, as are all the other characters except for some kids in the very last spread.

The tips garnered here could be used to scare just about anyone, and for those scared of ghosts, at least your carpets will be clean from all the vacuuming. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 21, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5247-0190-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: July 16, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2018

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