HONEYBEE

POEMS

Mixing memory, science and social issues, these selections vary widely in their accessibility and interest. As always, however, Nye’s sheer joy in communicating, creativity and caring shine through. The focus shifts continually—from honeybees (champion communicators, threatened species) to the continuing violence in the Middle East to memories of childhood (her own and her son’s) to specific situations in which people manage to transcend their differences. These shifts in tone, topic and format require both flexibility and concentration from readers. Rereading, however, is rewarded because of delicate connections and graceful phrases that might be missed the first time through. While much of the work is serious in tone, there are moments of humor also. Most likely to appeal to adults and older teens, this will be warmly welcomed by fans as it offers intriguing glimpses of Nye’s personal beliefs and experience. (Poetry. 12+)

Pub Date: March 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-06-085390-7

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Greenwillow

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2008

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Suggest to able teen readers who already have the appropriate background knowledge.

EYE OF THE STORM

NASA, DRONES, AND THE RACE TO CRACK THE HURRICANE CODE

From the Scientists in the Field series

A high-altitude drone built for the Air Force is repurposed to investigate hurricane behavior in a NASA–sponsored project headquartered at Wallops Island, Virginia.

This latest title in a long-running series looks at cutting-edge meteorological research with implications for the billions of people around the world who live in the paths of tropical cyclones. Opening with a chapter about the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, it goes on to explain hurricane formation and NASA’s Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission. Cherrix introduces the Global Hawk drone project and describes preparations for a sample flight over the intensifying Hurricane Edouard in 2014. Finally she shows how another tropical storm, the 1970 Bhola cyclone in the Indian Ocean, led to the creation of a new nation, Bangladesh. This is real science, which, as the author points out, takes time—time to amass and analyze data and then to submit and have it vetted before publication. But it doesn’t make for very compelling reading. Readers drawn in by the dramatic cover and opening description of a tragic teen death as a result of Hurricane Sandy may get bogged down in the scientific and engineering detail, which uses appropriate but unfamiliar technical terms and acronyms, defined in context but hard to remember. They may struggle to keep straight the many scientists involved.

Suggest to able teen readers who already have the appropriate background knowledge. (hurricane preparedness, glossary, chapter notes, index) (Nonfiction. 14-18)

Pub Date: April 25, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-544-41165-4

Page Count: 80

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: March 6, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2017

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IS THIS FOREVER, OR WHAT?

POEMS AND PAINTINGS FROM TEXAS

This sumptuously designed gathering of poetry and paintings from 140 Texans (or former Texans) will lead readers not so much to that state specifically, as to a state of mind: a “sense of generous horizons and spaciousness,” to quote the much-honored editor. Ranging in style from abstract to photorealistic, the 44 paintings include still lifes, landscapes, portraits of people or wildlife, evocations of folk art, pop art, or expressionistic studies in color. The poetry, being all free verse and, with a single exception (plus scattered phrases), in English, is less varied in voice or imagery, but flows smoothly from one selection to the next. Despite recurring references to snakes, heat, pecans, and the sound of running water, it deals less with distinctively regional topics than with such universal themes as the immigrant experience, small-town customers at the Dairy Queen, vivid childhood memories, personal reflections, absent friends, or contemplations of nature. Except for Pat Mora, Sandra Cisneros, and a handful of others, these poets and artists have had little or no exposure nationwide; Nye has done them a real service with this deep (though not wide) cross-section. (biographical notes, indexes) (Poetry. YA)

Pub Date: March 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-06-051178-8

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Greenwillow

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2004

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