THE CHRONICLES OF FAERIE

THE BOOK OF DREAMS

The sequel to The Light-Bearer’s Daughter (2007) and the last in The Chronicles of Faerie again features Dana Faolan, a teen living between two worlds—the land of her Faerie mother and the human world of her father. Born in Ireland, transplanted to Canada, Dana feels lost. Tragedy strikes when a mysterious force closes all portals between Faerie and Earth, and it is up to Dana to find a way to restore them—or each world will die. Twice as long as its predecessor, this is a stronger effort with a better plot. Unfortunately, it still remains a bare skeleton rather than a living, breathing tale. Muddled and conflicted, it mixes multiple languages and references both historical and arcane. Characters are not crafted so much as they are lists of adverbs and adjectives. There is no doubt that Melling is knowledgeable and deeply enthusiastic about all things spiritual and environmental, but what’s lacking here is the skill of a storyteller, making its length a shameful waste and a sad end to a series that began with promise and discipline. (Fantasy. 10-15)

Pub Date: May 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-8109-8346-5

Page Count: 720

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2009

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It’s slanted toward action-oriented readers, who will find that Briticisms meld with all the other wonders of magic school.

HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE

From the Harry Potter series , Vol. 1

In a rousing first novel, already an award-winner in England, Harry is just a baby when his magical parents are done in by Voldemort, a wizard so dastardly other wizards are scared to mention his name.

So Harry is brought up by his mean Uncle Vernon and Aunt Petunia Dursley, and picked on by his horrid cousin Dudley. He knows nothing about his magical birthright until ten years later, when he learns he’s to attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Hogwarts is a lot like English boarding school, except that instead of classes in math and grammar, the curriculum features courses in Transfiguration, Herbology, and Defense Against the Dark Arts. Harry becomes the star player of Quidditch, a sort of mid-air ball game. With the help of his new friends Ron and Hermione, Harry solves a mystery involving a sorcerer’s stone that ultimately takes him to the evil Voldemort. This hugely enjoyable fantasy is filled with imaginative details, from oddly flavored jelly beans to dragons’ eggs hatched on the hearth.

It’s slanted toward action-oriented readers, who will find that Briticisms meld with all the other wonders of magic school. (Fiction. 10-14)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1998

ISBN: 978-0-590-35340-3

Page Count: 309

Publisher: Levine/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1998

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THE TRUE MEANING OF SMEKDAY

Gratuity Tucci (“Tip” for short) has a problem. Aliens have invaded Earth, stolen her mother, and now she and the rest of humanity are being shunted onto small reservations while the invaders (the Boov) take over the rest of the planet. In avoiding this plan, via her family car, Tip runs across J.Lo, a renegade Boov with problems of his own. Together, girl and alien attempt to locate Tip’s mother only to discover that an even greater alien threat is imminent. It’s up to the two heroes to defeat the invaders, Boov and otherwise, and save the day. The humor in this story is undeniably unique, containing a skewed worldview that children will certainly enjoy. Yet while the first half of the book is an entirely funny road trip of the Kerouac-meets-E.T. variety, the second half slows down considerably. Rex has such a nice grasp of small tender moments amidst a world gone haywire, it’s a pity the book wasn’t pared down significantly. Inspired but problematic. (Fiction. 11-15)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-7868-4900-0

Page Count: 432

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2007

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