ROAR!

A lonely little lion looks for a playmate, but his friendly roaring drives all the animals away in this bland counting/color book. Having sent 1 red monkey, 2 pink flamingos, 3 orange warthogs, and so forth scurrying off, little lion at last finds 9 other yellow lion cubs, and joins them for an exuberant, stampede-inducing collective roar. The animals are easily recognizable and wear either cheery (lions) or disconcerted (everything else) expressions, but neither they, nor Edwards's rhymes—“Friendly little lion cub feels a little sad, / Plods down the pathway—pad, pad, pad.”—display the imaginative sparkle of Some Smug Slug (1996), Honk! (1998) or this team's other books. Young children may enjoy the safari, but it's a routine trip over well-traveled territory. (Picture book. 4-5)

Pub Date: May 31, 2000

ISBN: 0-06-028384-X

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2000

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TUCKER FLIPS

A small, artless introduction to a terrier with an independent spirit. As soon as he’s old enough to leave his cozy bed, Tucker displays the urge for adventure, learning how to balance on a skateboard, dive off the sofa, and dig deep holes in the snow—all skills that come in handy one winter day when he jumps onto a sled. Down the slope it careens, coming to an abrupt stop that sends him looping into a snow bank. Up rushes a child to cuddle him, followed by his siblings and worried mother. Through it all, Tucker shows not a trace of fear, though he does enjoy all the subsequent attention. With pictures that rival Sandra Boynton’s for clean-lined simplicity, and a text that is not cut down to bare description, this book, similar to John Schoenherr’s Rebel (1995), gives children who are ready for the first step of adventure some reassurance that they won’t be left out in the cold. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-525-46259-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 1999

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A smelly situation contrived to create an easily legible text for budding readers.

DON'T HUG THE PUG

A baby who’s eager to pass out hugs is told to refrain from hugging the dog, a pug.

Dad tells baby the child can hug the bug, the rug, the jug, and even the slug. However, says Dad, “Don’t hug the pug!” It turns out that “the pug farts. It’s very stinky.” But baby hugs the flatulent pug anyway…but the resulting malodorous scent appears to not be the fault of the sweet dog but of someone’s dirty diaper. The premise and outline of this silly story works as a repetitive pattern rhyme perfect for new readers. “Slug?” queries the child. Dad responds: “You can hug the bug and the rug and the jug and the slug, but…Don’t hug the pug!” Thin-lined cartoon drawings in muted hues depict a bearded father and a diapered baby (both white) on a rather messy floor in this British import; the text is contained entirely in speech balloons. Dog lovers may rejoice to note the pug is not the culprit, and early readers will gain a clearer understanding of the building of a sound pattern. Endpapers feature line drawings of “-ug” words, including some not in the text, such as a mug and a plug.

A smelly situation contrived to create an easily legible text for budding readers. (Picture book. 4-5)

Pub Date: Oct. 8, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-908714-65-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Cicada Books

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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