Advice books abound, some more readable than others. This work should be numbered among the “others.” Starting with a...

ON YOUR OWN

A COLLEGE READINESS GUIDE FOR TEENS WITH ADHD/LD

This slender volume provides advice for teens with ADHD and learning disabilities on successfully making the transition to college.

Advice books abound, some more readable than others. This work should be numbered among the “others.” Starting with a discouraging caveat—only about 50% of teens with ADHD/LD will either still be enrolled in college or have graduated after five to six years—this effort has readers complete a self-assessment test. It includes topics such as Organizational Skills, Self-Knowledge, Daily Living Skills and Time Management Skills. Based on the results, readers are given advice on learning ways to manage in college. Teens should analyze their results, write goal statements and action plans, track their progress and evaluate and modify their plans. Each topic from the test has a chapter of advice, followed by a list of pertinent websites. In the Daily Living Skills section, the advice on laundry begins, “First concentrate on washing. No matter how you choose to instruct yourself, you need to learn about washing first.” While all the advice is probably worthwhile, the format is dry, sometimes condescending and often monotonously repetitive. It’s difficult to imagine busy, college-bound teens having the time to attempt the development of so many action plans and so much list-making.

Pub Date: July 15, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-4338-0955-2

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Magination/American Psychological Association

Review Posted Online: June 20, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2011

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Skilled and graceful exploration of the soul of an astonishing human being.

MOUNTAINS BEYOND MOUNTAINS

Full-immersion journalist Kidder (Home Town, 1999, etc.) tries valiantly to keep up with a front-line, muddy-and-bloody general in the war against infectious disease in Haiti and elsewhere.

The author occasionally confesses to weariness in this gripping account—and why not? Paul Farmer, who has an M.D. and a Ph.D. from Harvard, appears to be almost preternaturally intelligent, productive, energetic, and devoted to his causes. So trotting alongside him up Haitian hills, through international airports and Siberian prisons and Cuban clinics, may be beyond the capacity of a mere mortal. Kidder begins with a swift account of his first meeting with Farmer in Haiti while working on a story about American soldiers, then describes his initial visit to the doctor’s clinic, where the journalist felt he’d “encountered a miracle.” Employing guile, grit, grins, and gifts from generous donors (especially Boston contractor Tom White), Farmer has created an oasis in Haiti where TB and AIDS meet their Waterloos. The doctor has an astonishing rapport with his patients and often travels by foot for hours over difficult terrain to treat them in their dwellings (“houses” would be far too grand a word). Kidder pauses to fill in Farmer’s amazing biography: his childhood in an eccentric family sounds like something from The Mosquito Coast; a love affair with Roald Dahl’s daughter ended amicably; his marriage to a Haitian anthropologist produced a daughter whom he sees infrequently thanks to his frenetic schedule. While studying at Duke and Harvard, Kidder writes, Farmer became obsessed with public health issues; even before he’d finished his degrees he was spending much of his time in Haiti establishing the clinic that would give him both immense personal satisfaction and unsurpassed credibility in the medical worlds he hopes to influence.

Skilled and graceful exploration of the soul of an astonishing human being.

Pub Date: Sept. 16, 2003

ISBN: 0-375-50616-0

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2003

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A grim but worthy read.

A CAVE IN THE CLOUDS

A YOUNG WOMAN'S ESCAPE FROM ISIS

This book chronicles the traumatic story of Ahmed, a young Ezidi woman who was abducted by Islamic State group forces from her village in northern Iraq and subsequently forced into sexual slavery.

Ahmed’s ordeal began at age 18, when IS’ army rolled into her native village of Kocho, thwarting her family’s attempt to seek refuge in the surrounding mountains. The village population was promptly split between the men, driven to an unknown fate, and the women and children, rounded up in a nearby school before being forced aboard trucks heading to neighboring Syria. Months of captivity in the most extreme conditions ensued before she was finally sold—alongside Navine, a friend met in captivity, and her nephew, Eivan, who she pretended was her son—to al-Amriki, an American citizen–turned-emir, a high-ranking position in IS’ military hierarchy. In a succession of fortunate circumstances and bold decisions, the trio managed to escape, first from the compound where they were held captive, and then from Syria toward a Turkish refugee camp. Ahmed, reunited with what was left of her family, attempted to heal her wounds and rebuild her life. The first-person narration provides important context for those unfamiliar with the Ezidi. Readers will find it hard not to empathize and be moved by Ahmed’s heart-wrenching ordeal and will likely forgive some of the book’s naïve essentialisms, plot holes, and unfortunate Eurocentrisms.

A grim but worthy read. (authors’ note, map, epilogue) (Nonfiction. 16-adult)

Pub Date: April 9, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-77321-235-7

Page Count: 248

Publisher: Annick Press

Review Posted Online: Dec. 19, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2019

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