Jones shows that the best professional wrestling is a kind of primal theater, and a far cry from the much more brutal mixed...

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THE MAIN EVENT

THE MOVES AND MUSCLE OF PRO WRESTLING

A tight yet thorough history of wrestling as "sports entertainment"—read that as meaning staged—from Jones.

This is not the story of the sport or of two Olympians or high schoolers going at it for pin or points, but of the art of making the blows and throws look like the real thing while the outcome has been predetermined. Sometimes that is a little difficult to understand from Jones’ text—“Fans understand. They know what wrestling is all about: Two men, one ring. The main event,” doesn’t exactly chime with “the fix is in.” Similarly, the notion of staged fighting is at odds with the very real damage that can be done, as when Killer Kowlaski ripped off Yukon Eric’s ear during a turnbuckle slam. Indeed, it is a tribute to Jones that he acknowledges the increasing thuggishness of professional wrestling in the 1990s that turned many away, a trend that was gradually averted. But Jones is also a fan, one who can see the fun and appreciate the personalities and the drama. He gets fairly involved in tracking the evolution of the various professional circuits and the shenanigans of the promoter Vince McMahon, but he hits an enjoyable stride when telling the stories of ring heroes—Gorgeous George, Strangler Lewis, Andre the Giant, Hulk Hogan, The Undertaker, The Rock—their famous bouts and their signature moves.

Jones shows that the best professional wrestling is a kind of primal theater, and a far cry from the much more brutal mixed martial arts, which is sadly eclipsing its fan base. (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-7613-8635-3

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Millbrook/Lerner

Review Posted Online: July 18, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2012

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During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money...

QUEENS OF THE ICE

In the 1930s, the Canadian female ice-hockey team called the Rivulettes dominated the ice.

During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money to play. From 1931-1940, the Preston Rivulettes, led by Hilda Ranscome, overwhelmed all other teams, capturing the national title in the four years that they could afford to travel far enough to compete for it. With the pressure of the war, and because they were no longer capturing fan enthusiasm since they always won, the Rivulettes disbanded in 1942. After the war, the culture had changed, and women’s ice hockey nearly disappeared until a recent rebirth. This effort describes in detail many of the key games the team played over that decade and the way that their remarkable record has been largely ignored by the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. Though the book effectively captures the scrappy nature of the games (with numerous penalties in each for high sticking and fighting), disappointingly, it lacks any significant biographical information on team members. Only a couple are very briefly sketched. Readers will wonder what made this team so great; more information about the players might have provided key insights.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-55277-721-3

Page Count: 136

Publisher: James Lorimer

Review Posted Online: July 20, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2011

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  • SPONSORED PLACEMENT

One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

AFTER ALL I'VE DONE

A middle-aged woman sidelined by a horrific accident finds even sharper pains waiting on the other side of her recuperation in this expert nightmare by Hardy, familiar to many readers as Megan Hart, author of All the Secrets We Keep (2017), etc.

Five months ago, while she was on her way to the hospital with an ailing gallbladder, Diana Sparrow’s car hit a deer on a rural Pennsylvania road. When she awoke, she was minus her gallbladder, two working collarbones (and therefore two functioning arms), and her memory. During a recovery that would’ve been impossible without the constant ministrations of Harriett Richmond, the mother-in-law who’s the real reason Diana married her husband, Jonathan, Diana’s discovered that Jonathan has been cheating on her with her childhood friend Valerie Delagatti. Divorce is out of the question: Diana’s grown used to the pampered lifestyle the prenup she’d signed would snatch away from her. Every day is filled with torments. She slips and falls in a pool of wine on her kitchen floor she’s sure she didn’t spill herself. At the emergency room, her credit card and debit card are declined. She feels that she hates oppressively solicitous Harriett but has no idea why. Her sessions with her psychiatrist fail to heal her rage at her adoptive mother, an addict who abandoned her then returned only to disappear again and die an ugly death. Even worse, her attempts to recover her lost memory lead to an excruciatingly paced series of revelations. Val says Diana asked her to seduce Jonathan. Diana realizes that Cole, a fellow student in her watercolor class, isn’t the stranger she’d thought he was. Where can this maze of deceptions possibly end?

One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-64385-470-0

Page Count: 310

Publisher: Crooked Lane

Review Posted Online: Aug. 19, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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This in-depth guide offers plenty to learn and do for adventurers of all skill and experience levels.

THE YOUNG ADVENTURER'S GUIDE TO (ALMOST) EVERYTHING

BUILD A FORT, CAMP LIKE A CHAMP, POOP IN THE WOODS—45 ACTION-PACKED OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

Outdoor-adventure activities combine wisdom and fun in this practical guide to the wild.

Knowledge about the natural world and its resources used to be passed down from one generation to the next, as it was required for survival. Although modern society no longer requires familiarity with wild edibles, forecasting weather from clouds, and making a friction fire, these skills remain useful, say the authors of this handy guide. A thoughtful introduction acknowledges the Native American origins of many of the skills introduced in the book. Part 1, “Secrets of the Woods,” includes tapping a maple tree and navigating by the stars. Part 2 covers camping skills from tying knots to brushing your teeth with a stick. Part 3 offers instructions for making such useful items as a willow basket, a log raft, or a birch-bark knife sheath (there is a discussion of knife handling and safety). Part 4 shows readers how to make fun things from nature, like a whistle from a stick or a kite from turkey feathers (“ask a turkey hunter or look on eBay or Etsy”). The instructions are remarkably clear, and black-and-white illustrations add visual interest, levity, and clarity when needed. Fascinating enough to read cover to cover without setting foot outside, it will also be a reliable companion on camping and hiking trips to augment hours of outdoor exploring.

This in-depth guide offers plenty to learn and do for adventurers of all skill and experience levels. (Nonfiction. 11-17)

Pub Date: April 16, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-61180-594-9

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Roost Books/Shambhala

Review Posted Online: March 3, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2019

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