As a sports historian, Jones has done a thorough job, but it’s for MMA fans only.

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ULTIMATE FIGHTING

THE BRAINS AND BRAWN OF MIXED MARTIAL ARTS

From the Spectacular Sports series

An overview of the sport known as mixed martial arts and some of its players, from fight-fan Jones.

Mixed martial arts is a furious style of fighting that combines a variety of traditions—sambo, jiujitsu, muay thai and taekwondo, as well as catch wrestling and boxing—into an acrobatic display of violence. One reason for the sport’s appeal is that it is real, as opposed to the sham antics of professional wrestling: The blows are true, and the blood is, too. Jones surveys the origins of the sport in sometimes-breathless prose, with all its infighting and rough-and-tumble antics. He profiles many of the fighters and gives highlights of their great matchups. Details are likely to appall readers who are not already enthusiasts: “Sonnen struck Silva’s body and face nearly 300 times,” in a match that was merely minutes long. And can Jones really be serious when he writes, “It is well known that many boxers have suffered long-term effects due to repeated punches to the head, but the sport of MMA is still too young to know what a career of taking strikes to the head will do”? Duh. These fighters wear minimal gloves, and one look at their faces in the many photos that accompany his book will let readers know just what is going on.

As a sports historian, Jones has done a thorough job, but it’s for MMA fans only. (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4677-0934-7

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Millbrook

Review Posted Online: Aug. 14, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2013

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During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money...

QUEENS OF THE ICE

In the 1930s, the Canadian female ice-hockey team called the Rivulettes dominated the ice.

During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money to play. From 1931-1940, the Preston Rivulettes, led by Hilda Ranscome, overwhelmed all other teams, capturing the national title in the four years that they could afford to travel far enough to compete for it. With the pressure of the war, and because they were no longer capturing fan enthusiasm since they always won, the Rivulettes disbanded in 1942. After the war, the culture had changed, and women’s ice hockey nearly disappeared until a recent rebirth. This effort describes in detail many of the key games the team played over that decade and the way that their remarkable record has been largely ignored by the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. Though the book effectively captures the scrappy nature of the games (with numerous penalties in each for high sticking and fighting), disappointingly, it lacks any significant biographical information on team members. Only a couple are very briefly sketched. Readers will wonder what made this team so great; more information about the players might have provided key insights.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-55277-721-3

Page Count: 136

Publisher: James Lorimer

Review Posted Online: July 20, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2011

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This in-depth guide offers plenty to learn and do for adventurers of all skill and experience levels.

THE YOUNG ADVENTURER'S GUIDE TO (ALMOST) EVERYTHING

BUILD A FORT, CAMP LIKE A CHAMP, POOP IN THE WOODS—45 ACTION-PACKED OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

Outdoor-adventure activities combine wisdom and fun in this practical guide to the wild.

Knowledge about the natural world and its resources used to be passed down from one generation to the next, as it was required for survival. Although modern society no longer requires familiarity with wild edibles, forecasting weather from clouds, and making a friction fire, these skills remain useful, say the authors of this handy guide. A thoughtful introduction acknowledges the Native American origins of many of the skills introduced in the book. Part 1, “Secrets of the Woods,” includes tapping a maple tree and navigating by the stars. Part 2 covers camping skills from tying knots to brushing your teeth with a stick. Part 3 offers instructions for making such useful items as a willow basket, a log raft, or a birch-bark knife sheath (there is a discussion of knife handling and safety). Part 4 shows readers how to make fun things from nature, like a whistle from a stick or a kite from turkey feathers (“ask a turkey hunter or look on eBay or Etsy”). The instructions are remarkably clear, and black-and-white illustrations add visual interest, levity, and clarity when needed. Fascinating enough to read cover to cover without setting foot outside, it will also be a reliable companion on camping and hiking trips to augment hours of outdoor exploring.

This in-depth guide offers plenty to learn and do for adventurers of all skill and experience levels. (Nonfiction. 11-17)

Pub Date: April 16, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-61180-594-9

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Roost Books/Shambhala

Review Posted Online: March 3, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2019

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