A compelling argument and a spirited call to action against workplace age discrimination.

READ REVIEW

I'M NOT DONE

IT'S TIME TO TALK ABOUT AGEISM IN THE WORKPLACE

A business book about countering age bias in the workplace.

Communications and marketing consultant Rocks’ inspired guide aims to empower older employees who’ve become marginalized by corporate decision-makers due to ageism, which she calls “the last socially sanctioned prejudice.” Throughout her long career in communications, the author has witnessed great progress against workplace discrimination, but she acknowledges that there’s still more work to be done. But she hasn’t just observed the disturbing trend of companies ousting older, veteran employees in favor of younger ones—it actually happened to her, which started her on a personal fight for justice and workplace rights. Rocks writes succinctly but convincingly about the proliferation of age bias and its damaging, insidious, and demoralizing effects on businesses and employees alike. In a persuasive and appealingly direct manner, the author urges business leaders to embrace the idea of an age-diversified workplace. Specifically, she encourages corporate leaders to evaluate the unconscious bias in their workplaces through a series of reflective queries (“How many times have you heard something described as a ‘senior moment’?”). She bolsters her plea for change by including a chorus of anonymous voices, mostly of baby boomers, who found themselves incrementally sidelined, undervalued, and eventually laid off from livelihoods that gave them joy, fulfillment, and purpose. Some refused to retire when asked to do so and were promptly fired, and others had complex job-search experiences. Their stories are illuminating and also cautionary, as Rocks warns: “No matter what your age, you will eventually join the ranks of the fifty-somethings, and you probably should have a strategy.” Her concluding chapter, which outlines steps that corporations can take to enact change, is particularly invaluable.

A compelling argument and a spirited call to action against workplace age discrimination.

Pub Date: Jan. 23, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5445-1238-9

Page Count: 178

Publisher: Lioncrest Publishing

Review Posted Online: March 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

Did you like this book?

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more