The book’s belief in literacy simply shines through and will appeal to families in search of an attractively illustrated...

MOUSIE, I WILL READ TO YOU

Follow along as a little mouse is taught to love literacy.

Opening on a tiny mouse upon a parent’s lap, snoozing as the parent reads, the book shows how the inquisitive rodent grows into an independent reader “With a flashlight in your room / Reading a chapter book,” then an absorbed college student, and finally the parent of his own little book lover, creating a sentimental ode to lifelong literacy. Hidden within the sweeping, flowery language are step-by-step directions for encouraging emergent literacy: building receptive and expressive language skills with rich vocabulary; modeling complex sentences; regularly sharing songs, stories, and poetry; curating print-rich environments; and utilizing local libraries. It’s a comprehensive list, and grown-ups may appreciate the helpful coaching, especially the “tips for raising readers” appendix. Preschool children, however, may not be entranced by the lengthy free-verse poetry, high-level vocabulary and aspirational direct address of the wise adult guiding a child. If the earnest text is a little message-heavy, the vintage-style digital illustrations help make the medicine go down. Stylishly rendered in dappled, desaturated colors and with oversized ears and lengthy curled tails, the mice are a blend of sophisticated and sweet. Chunky scarves, retro toys, warm domestic scenes and lively playground action bring the mouse’s world to life.

The book’s belief in literacy simply shines through and will appeal to families in search of an attractively illustrated parenting manual. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Nov. 13, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5247-1536-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Schwartz & Wade/Random

Review Posted Online: Aug. 14, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2018

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A good bet for the youngest bird-watchers.

MAMA BUILT A LITTLE NEST

Echoing the meter of “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” Ward uses catchy original rhymes to describe the variety of nests birds create.

Each sweet stanza is complemented by a factual, engaging description of the nesting habits of each bird. Some of the notes are intriguing, such as the fact that the hummingbird uses flexible spider web to construct its cup-shaped nest so the nest will stretch as the chicks grow. An especially endearing nesting behavior is that of the emperor penguin, who, with unbelievable patience, incubates the egg between his tummy and his feet for up to 60 days. The author clearly feels a mission to impart her extensive knowledge of birds and bird behavior to the very young, and she’s found an appealing and attractive way to accomplish this. The simple rhymes on the left page of each spread, written from the young bird’s perspective, will appeal to younger children, and the notes on the right-hand page of each spread provide more complex factual information that will help parents answer further questions and satisfy the curiosity of older children. Jenkins’ accomplished collage illustrations of common bird species—woodpecker, hummingbird, cowbird, emperor penguin, eagle, owl, wren—as well as exotics, such as flamingoes and hornbills, are characteristically naturalistic and accurate in detail.

A good bet for the youngest bird-watchers.   (author’s note, further resources) (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: March 18, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4424-2116-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Beach Lane/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Jan. 4, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2014

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A good choice for just those days when Mom and Dad do go away and leave their children in charge of Grandpa.

HOW TO BABYSIT A GRANDPA

From the How To... series

Reagan’s second outing is a tongue-in-cheek reversal of roles as a young boy instructs readers on how best to entertain and care for a grandpa while Mom and Dad are away.

First, he instructs them to hide when Grandpa rings the doorbell—resist the wiggles and giggles, and only pop out when he gives up. Then, reassure him that Mom and Dad will be back and distract him with a snack—heavy on the ice cream, cookies, ketchup and olives. Throughout the day, the narrator takes his grandpa for a walk, entertains him, plays with him, puts him down for a nap and encourages him to clean up before Mom and Dad’s return. Lists on almost every spread give readers a range of ideas for things to try, provided their grandfathers are not diabetic or arthritic, or have high blood pressure or a heart condition. These lists also provide Wildish with lots of fodder for his vignette illustrations. His digital artwork definitely focuses on the humor, with laugh-out-loud scenes and funny hidden details. And his characters’ expressive faces also help to fill in the grandfather-grandson relationship that Reagan's deadpan narrative leaves unstated.

A good choice for just those days when Mom and Dad do go away and leave their children in charge of Grandpa. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 10, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-375-86713-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: Feb. 5, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2012

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