GIRL ANATOMY by Rebecca Bloom

GIRL ANATOMY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A young woman hopes to master maturity (though only if she gets a boyfriend to make everything better) in an overly chatty, juvenile debut.

At 24, Lilly has a degree from Brown (as does author Bloom), a lengthy gastronomic tour of Paris, and a current job at a women’s magazine under her belt, though all this worldly experience does nothing to elevate her puerile narrative. The plot in a nutshell: Lilly freaks out when best friend Maya announces her engagement. Lilly feels jealous, left behind, wondering why she too can’t find Mr. Right. She always thought she’d be the first of her friends to marry, but she doesn’t even have a date for the wedding! A tour of past relationships is woven in between descriptions of the LA parties Lilly goes to, what she wears, what drugs she takes, and the variety of health care products she needs to sample and write about for her job. She was able to overcome her penis phobia with Sam, her first college sweetheart, but of course he broke her heart. Then there was the elusive Jonah, an Adonis with commitment issues. In between there’s a mother-daughter trip to Las Vegas (her parents are just wonderful) and a reconciliation with Maya, whose engagement isn’t all smooth sailing. Little goes on, though Lilly has a lot to say, and furthermore it’s Lilly times two when a difficult situation arises: an angel and a devil duke it out on her proverbial shoulder anytime Lilly may be lying to herself or others. Though fairly directionless, the story wraps up when Jonah reenters the picture, now ready to be Lilly’s boyfriend. Sans some of the sex and drug references, Girl Anatomy might be suitable for the YA market; as is, it’s hard to imagine a grown woman enjoying Lilly’s inane chatter about love.

Though aiming for hip, smart and sassy, the jokey tone and repetitive observations fall flat.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 2002
ISBN: 0-06-621257-X
Page count: 272pp
Publisher: Morrow/HarperCollins
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1st, 2002