Like most yogis it’s not perfect—but it’s an economical and nonthreatening way to begin a yoga practice.

READ REVIEW

YOGA FOR YOU

FEEL CALMER, STRONGER, HAPPIER!

From the Good for You series

Clean layout, swirly page decorations, simple explanations, and a friendly tone will help this title find its preteen audience.

Reassuring explanations of general yoga principles are followed by step-by-step instructions. Each pose gets its own page, though exactly how to achieve each posture is not always clear from the picture. An energizing sequence unfolds in 18 lavender pages; a calming sequence follows on 17 light blue pages. The flow between poses is not shown. Corpse Pose is shown only at the end even though Savasana often both starts and finishes practices. Appropriate cautions are on almost every spread (“If this feels too intense…”), but postures are shown in their most advanced versions and modifications are not illustrated. Readers are reminded to do the asymmetrical poses on both sides, but these poses are not labeled as such. The English name of each pose is followed by the Sanskrit word highlighted in pink (sans pronunciation guide). Thick board covers help the pages lay flat, making the book easy to consult during an exercise sequence. Almost all the figures shown are female and white. Every five or six pages, a male demonstrates a pose. Apparently chubby kids don’t do yoga; all the images are slim. More detailed discussions of breath work and meditation plus internet resources, a glossary, and an index complete the package.

Like most yogis it’s not perfect—but it’s an economical and nonthreatening way to begin a yoga practice. (Nonfiction. 10-14)

Pub Date: April 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-63322-319-6

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Walter Foster Jr.

Review Posted Online: Feb. 20, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2017

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Unfortunately, a great example of a book that adults think young people should read instead of one they want to read.

HIGH

EVERYTHING YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT DRUGS, ALCOHOL, AND ADDICTION

After various books on addiction for adults and teens, here the Sheffs attempt to cover “everything” an early adolescent wants to know on the topic.

It’s a bold promise that, sadly, is not fulfilled. The book is divided into four main sections. The first summarizes Nic’s addiction and journey to sobriety before delving into a brief, general examination of drug and alcohol abuse. The second section surveys popular drug choices, and the third examines the road from drug use to drug addiction. The last section is a dialogue between the co-authors. Overall, the book does many things right: It never assigns blame to users, and it discusses such topics as marijuana legalization and opioid addiction without bias. Nic also periodically offers personal insights in separate text boxes. These points may not be enough to save the book, however. The overall tone is dry. Examples of adolescent addicts are discussed, but their stories are too brief to allow readers to find emotional touchstones. And though graphs and charts offer visuals, the clip art–like illustrations give the book the off-putting feel of a textbook. An “addictionary” confusingly arranges drugs by type instead of name (do readers know/care that PCP is a “dissociative drug” and GHB is a “club drug”?) and omits some current street names. A list of resources for recovery and further reading is appended.

Unfortunately, a great example of a book that adults think young people should read instead of one they want to read. (Nonfiction. 10-14)

Pub Date: Jan. 8, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-544-64434-2

Page Count: 272

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: Sept. 17, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2018

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Informative and entertaining throughout for readers undead or otherwise.

MONSTROUS

THE LORE, GORE, AND SCIENCE BEHIND YOUR FAVORITE MONSTERS

Eight renowned monsters of film, fantasy, and folklore offer gateways to scientific fields and enquiries.

“The real magic is science,” writes Beccia (They Lost Their Heads!, 2018), and to back up the claim, she surrounds introductions to familiar fantastic creatures, from Dracula to Bigfoot, the Kraken, werewolves, and King Kong, with excursions into diverse scientific topics relevant to each. After leading off with a look at the chemical bases of fear and other emotions, for instance, an account of Mary Shelley’s creation of Frankenstein’s monster serves as entree for discussions of electricity, the experiments of Galvani and others, how defibrillators work, glowing pigs and other products of genetic experimentation, lobotomies, head transplants, and how certain breakfast-cereal dyes turn poop pink. Moreover, later chapters invite readers to sink their teeth into a vampiric timeline from ancient Babylonia and the Twilight saga, weigh King Kong’s unlikely mass ratio (“Did Beauty or Math Kill the Beast?”), glimpse a deep-sea “bone-eating snot-flower worm” chowing down on a dead whale, and assemble an official Centers for Disease Control zombie-preparedness kit that would, uncoincidentally, be just as useful in a pandemic or other natural disaster. The monsters are more comical than scary in the author’s painted illustrations, and though her (living) cast defaults to white, she does include some brown-skinned figures.

Informative and entertaining throughout for readers undead or otherwise. (index, glossary, large bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-13)

Pub Date: Sept. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5124-4916-7

Page Count: 148

Publisher: Carolrhoda

Review Posted Online: July 24, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2019

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