A valuable tool for those concerned about leaving a legacy, financial and otherwise.

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LEGACY

THE HIDDEN KEYS TO OPTIMIZING YOUR FAMILY WEALTH DECISIONS

In this practical and thoughtful financial guide, a financial adviser who’s worked with many wealthy clients offers advice for passing along a family’s wealth.

Orlando’s debut promotes the idea that while “capital” is generally perceived as meaning financial capital, other capitals—including spiritual capital, human capital, intellectual capital, and social capital—are valuable forms as well. Spiritual capital is one of the most powerful to pass along, he writes, because it drives decisions involving all the other kinds. He compares spiritual capital to a GPS system that helps a driver chart his course and arrive at a desired destination. Solid legacy planning, he believes, is “not about leaving a legacy, but about living our legacy.” The questions he discusses provide an excellent starting point for any family considering its future financial decisions. For instance, do all children get an equal share of the inheritance, regardless of who actually worked in the family business? Do all receive the money at a certain age? Do they receive the inheritance before or after the parents pass on? His wealthy clients have included professional athletes and business owners, and while disguising the details to preserve their privacy, he uses their stories to show how different families make financial decisions. The author’s compassion is evident as he urges clients to consider their values when passing along their money. He writes of one professional athlete whose wife wanted to donate more money to charity. After consulting with the couple, the author realized the athlete was already contributing to various charities by autographing memorabilia and supporting events. When the wife saw the value of these activities and the husband agreed to a “giving budget” his wife could use, it was a win-win for the couple. The well-written book features clear, accessible advice that, though it may be intended for the wealthy, could apply to anyone interested in financial planning.

A valuable tool for those concerned about leaving a legacy, financial and otherwise.

Pub Date: Dec. 12, 2013

ISBN: 978-0989481007

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Legacy Capitals Press

Review Posted Online: March 12, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2015

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Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

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UNTAMED

More life reflections from the bestselling author on themes of societal captivity and the catharsis of personal freedom.

In her third book, Doyle (Love Warrior, 2016, etc.) begins with a life-changing event. “Four years ago,” she writes, “married to the father of my three children, I fell in love with a woman.” That woman, Abby Wambach, would become her wife. Emblematically arranged into three sections—“Caged,” “Keys,” “Freedom”—the narrative offers, among other elements, vignettes about the soulful author’s girlhood, when she was bulimic and felt like a zoo animal, a “caged girl made for wide-open skies.” She followed the path that seemed right and appropriate based on her Catholic upbringing and adolescent conditioning. After a downward spiral into “drinking, drugging, and purging,” Doyle found sobriety and the authentic self she’d been suppressing. Still, there was trouble: Straining an already troubled marriage was her husband’s infidelity, which eventually led to life-altering choices and the discovery of a love she’d never experienced before. Throughout the book, Doyle remains open and candid, whether she’s admitting to rigging a high school homecoming court election or denouncing the doting perfectionism of “cream cheese parenting,” which is about “giving your children the best of everything.” The author’s fears and concerns are often mirrored by real-world issues: gender roles and bias, white privilege, racism, and religion-fueled homophobia and hypocrisy. Some stories merely skim the surface of larger issues, but Doyle revisits them in later sections and digs deeper, using friends and familial references to personify their impact on her life, both past and present. Shorter pieces, some only a page in length, manage to effectively translate an emotional gut punch, as when Doyle’s therapist called her blooming extramarital lesbian love a “dangerous distraction.” Ultimately, the narrative is an in-depth look at a courageous woman eager to share the wealth of her experiences by embracing vulnerability and reclaiming her inner strength and resiliency.

Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

Pub Date: March 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-0125-8

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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A deftly argued case for a new kind of socialism that, while sure to inspire controversy, bears widespread discussion.

CAPITAL AND IDEOLOGY

A massive investigation of economic history in the service of proposing a political order to overcome inequality.

Readers who like their political manifestoes in manageable sizes, à la Common Sense or The Communist Manifesto, may be overwhelmed by the latest from famed French economist Piketty (Top Incomes in France in the Twentieth Century: Inequality and Redistribution, 1901-1998, 2014, etc.), but it’s a significant work. The author interrogates the principal forms of economic organization over time, from slavery to “non-European trifunctional societies,” Chinese-style communism, and “hypercapitalist” orders, in order to examine relative levels of inequality and its evolution. Each system is founded on an ideology, and “every ideology, no matter how extreme it may seem in its defense of inequality, expresses a certain idea of social justice.” In the present era, at least in the U.S., that idea of social justice would seem to be only that the big ones eat the little ones, the principal justification being that the wealthiest people became rich because they are “the most enterprising, deserving, and useful.” In fact, as Piketty demonstrates, there’s more to inequality than the mere “size of the income gap.” Contrary to hypercapitalist ideology and its defenders, the playing field is not level, the market is not self-regulating, and access is not evenly distributed. Against this, Piketty arrives at a proposed system that, among other things, would redistribute wealth across societies by heavy taxation, especially of inheritances, to create a “participatory socialism” in which power is widely shared and trade across nations is truly free. The word “socialism,” he allows, is a kind of Pandora’s box that can scare people off—and, he further acknowledges, “the Russian and Czech oligarchs who buy athletic teams and newspapers may not be the most savory characters, but the Soviet system was a nightmare and had to go.” Yet so, too, writes the author, is a capitalism that rewards so few at the expense of so many.

A deftly argued case for a new kind of socialism that, while sure to inspire controversy, bears widespread discussion.

Pub Date: March 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-674-98082-2

Page Count: 976

Publisher: Belknap/Harvard Univ.

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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