A warm, highly galvanizing, and proactive memoir about the power of spiritual satisfaction and self-integrity.

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AND THEN I MET MARGARET

STORIES OF ORDINARY GURUS I'VE MET

A self-made successful businessman shares how he unlocked the true key to inner peace and happiness in this debut book.    

A writer, lecturer, and innovative creator of Mind Adventure Inc., a consultancy program for professional and personal growth, White describes his humble beginnings as a child growing up enveloped in the friendly company of his beloved aunt and uncle. Yet he found himself confined to struggle in a poor Massachusetts mill town “scrambling for money.” This lean living motivated him to treat his youth as an atmosphere to grow from, not toward. As an adult, the author developed a talent for making money in business arenas such as real estate, restaurants, and entrepreneurialism. Still, even amid the great wealth he’d amassed by middle age, the perks of a luxury lifestyle and an accomplished professional reputation left him feeling incomplete. “My exterior world reflected material wealth, but my interior world was spiritually bankrupt,” he lamented. At age 50, a crisis of conscience brought White to the threshold of a higher understanding and valuing of peace and joy with a national and international quest for enlightenment. The inspiring life stories in White’s book (many have appeared in the Huffington Post) offer a thoughtful profile of his youth and the guidance gurus and unassuming life teachers he met and learned from. From a mother in a Maasai village in Kenya and a 50-something Boston peanut vendor to the more popular spiritual coaches like Marianne Williamson and Deepak Chopra, they all encouraged the author to embrace a vast assortment of large and small personal transformational experiences. Even a grade school student named Margaret managed to awaken in him “the possibility of starting a new life, as a new person.” Informed by meaningful encounters and leavened with humor, wit, and grace, White’s narrative is powered by the theory that everyone thrives on a beneficial combination of internal wisdom and serendipity. Whether or not readers ascribe to this process is not the point. The message remains a clear and hopeful one, and the life lessons closing each chapter form a friendly reminder of the possibilities of genuine human potential if it is gilded in kindness and compassion.

A warm, highly galvanizing, and proactive memoir about the power of spiritual satisfaction and self-integrity.   

Pub Date: Jan. 13, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-9802299-6-7

Page Count: 196

Publisher: Mind Adventure Press

Review Posted Online: Feb. 6, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2017

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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