This dad is a welcome role model for father figures everywhere.

OUR SHED

A FATHER-DAUGHTER BUILDING STORY

A father and daughter build a backyard shed—and their relationship.

Every step of the way, the father is teaching, guiding, and relating to his daughter in ways that affirm her desire to learn, to play, and to spend time with him. He explains why they need a shed; teaches her how to choose materials; shares a milkshake (with two straws); joins her in a dance on her own private dance floor. After measuring twice and cutting once, the two frame the walls and then take a break so she can battle “the nastiest dragon in the land” (depicted as a white chalk outline and described as “daddy-dragon” in the narration). In three days, the shed is ready to paint; she can’t choose just one color, so they get two…and father’s and daughter’s shed plans delightfully merge. Over four pages, the duo grab various tools from the shed to fuel their fun as they visually age and the seasons turn, the final of the four showing a new addition: the daughter’s son, who makes his own mark on the shed. O’Neill’s illustrations keep the focus on the pair and the work they do both building and bonding, the imaginative scenes just as colorful as reality but with the addition of white chalk–outlined figures. Dad has light skin and brown hair; his daughter has darker skin and short, straight black hair. Pair this with Hammer and Nails by Josh Bledsoe and illustrated by Jessica Warrick (2016).

This dad is a welcome role model for father figures everywhere. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 4, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-63217-264-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little Bigfoot/Sasquatch

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2021

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Sincere and wholehearted.

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I PROMISE

The NBA star offers a poem that encourages curiosity, integrity, compassion, courage, and self-forgiveness.

James makes his debut as a children’s author with a motivational poem touting life habits that children should strive for. In the first-person narration, he provides young readers with foundational self-esteem encouragement layered within basketball descriptions: “I promise to run full court and show up each time / to get right back up and let my magic shine.” While the verse is nothing particularly artful, it is heartfelt, and in her illustrations, Mata offers attention-grabbing illustrations of a diverse and enthusiastic group of children. Scenes vary, including classrooms hung with student artwork, an asphalt playground where kids jump double Dutch, and a gym populated with pint-sized basketball players, all clearly part of one bustling neighborhood. Her artistry brings black and brown joy to the forefront of each page. These children evince equal joy in learning and in play. One particularly touching double-page spread depicts two vignettes of a pair of black children, possibly siblings; in one, they cuddle comfortably together, and in the other, the older gives the younger a playful noogie. Adults will appreciate the closing checklist of promises, which emphasize active engagement with school. A closing note very generally introduces principles that underlie the Lebron James Family Foundation’s I Promise School (in Akron, Ohio). (This book was reviewed digitally with 10-by-20-inch double-page spreads viewed at 15% of actual size.)

Sincere and wholehearted. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 11, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-297106-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2020

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Well-meaning and with a lovely presentation, this sentimental effort may be aimed more at adults than kids.

MY LITTLE BRAVE GIRL

Little girls are given encouragement and assurance so they can meet the challenges of life as they move through the big, wide world.

Delicately soft watercolor-style art depicts naturalistic scenes with a diverse quintet of little girls portraying potential situations they will encounter, as noted by a narrative heavily dependent on a series of clichés. “The stars are high, and you can reach them,” it promises as three of the girls chase fireflies under a star-filled night sky. “Oceans run deep, and you will learn to swim,” it intones as one girl treads water and another leans over the edge of a boat to observe life on the ocean floor. “Your feet will take many steps, my brave little girl. / Let your heart lead the way.” Girls gingerly step across a brook before making their way through a meadow. The point of all these nebulous metaphors seems to be to inculcate in girls the independence, strength, and confidence they’ll need to succeed in their pursuits. Trying new things, such as foods, is a “delicious new adventure.” Though the quiet, gentle text is filled with uplifting words that parents will intuitively relate to or comprehend, the esoteric messages may be a bit sentimental and ambiguous for kids to understand or even connect to. (This book was reviewed digitally with 10.5-by-19-inch double-page spreads viewed at 50% of actual size.)

Well-meaning and with a lovely presentation, this sentimental effort may be aimed more at adults than kids. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: March 23, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-593-30072-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Jan. 13, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2021

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