WISH

WISHING TRADITIONS AROUND THE WORLD

Featuring tidbits of children’s folklore from 15 countries, this small collection provides a double-page spread on each custom, starting with a four-line poem followed by a short paragraph giving just enough information for young readers to absorb. The details are wonderfully expressed in Kleven’s jewel-toned mixed-media illustrations, which magically portray children and adults in rural and urban settings that look traditional and contemporary at the same time. From such religious traditions as inserting papers with wishes in Israel’s Wailing Wall to the less formal wish-making of blowing out the birthday candles in the United States, puffing dandelions in Ireland or seeing a single striped weasel in Zulu villages in South Africa, the author and illustrator present a playfulness and a hope for better lives that is contagious. Some details are lacking: There are further explanations of the traditions at the end, but no sources, and a finding game of some lucky symbols is presented without explanation thereof. Still, for pure fun, this will inspire children to try out all of these ways of wishing. (endpaper maps) (Informational picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-8118-5716-1

Page Count: 44

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2008

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A DOG NAMED SAM

A book that will make young dog-owners smile in recognition and confirm dogless readers' worst suspicions about the mayhem caused by pets, even winsome ones. Sam, who bears passing resemblance to an affable golden retriever, is praised for fetching the family newspaper, and goes on to fetch every other newspaper on the block. In the next story, only the children love Sam's swimming; he is yelled at by lifeguards and fishermen alike when he splashes through every watering hole he can find. Finally, there is woe to the entire family when Sam is bored and lonely for one long night. Boland has an essential message, captured in both both story and illustrations of this Easy-to-Read: Kids and dogs belong together, especially when it's a fun-loving canine like Sam. An appealing tale. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-8037-1530-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1996

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THE GIRL WHO LOVED WILD HORSES

            There are many parallel legends – the seal women, for example, with their strange sad longings – but none is more direct than this American Indian story of a girl who is carried away in a horses’ stampede…to ride thenceforth by the side of a beautiful stallion who leads the wild horses.  The girl had always loved horses, and seemed to understand them “in a special way”; a year after her disappearance her people find her riding beside the stallion, calf in tow, and take her home despite his strong resistance.  But she is unhappy and returns to the stallion; after that, a beautiful mare is seen riding always beside him.  Goble tells the story soberly, allowing it to settle, to find its own level.  The illustrations are in the familiar striking Goble style, but softened out here and there with masses of flowers and foliage – suitable perhaps for the switch in subject matter from war to love, but we miss the spanking clean design of Custer’s Last Battle and The Fetterman Fight.          6-7

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1978

ISBN: 0689845049

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bradbury

Review Posted Online: April 26, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1978

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