A concept book for the sharpest of eyes.

ABCITY

MAZE & SEEK-N-FIND

So many sights to see in a city!

This concept book works in two ways: as a maze through the city streets that traces through the entire book and as a seek-and-find, which is a page-to-page activity. The buildings in the city are shaped like alphabetical letters, hence the book’s title, and the items to find are on the buildings and outside of them and correspond to the buildings’ letters: an ambulance and banana on the A and B page, a jaguar on the J page, etc. The illustrations are carefully composed, with bird’s-eye-view shots of construction sites, train tracks, a hospital, a swimming pool, and much more. The objects to find are quite tiny, and because the streets form a maze, some readers may have trouble focusing on each page. Still, readers up for a challenge will enjoy spending time with this book. Laudably, Munro depicts a city where greenery is plentiful and where there are many different things to stumble upon—each day is its own journey. Though many people are depicted, they’re seen at a distance, making it hard to discern race or ethnicity. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

A concept book for the sharpest of eyes. (answer key) (Activity book. 5-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 28, 2022

ISBN: 978-0-7643-6481-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Schiffer

Review Posted Online: Sept. 14, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2022

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A good-enough introduction to a contested festivity but one that’s not in step with the community it’s for.

CELEBRATE KWANZAA

WITH CANDLES, COMMUNITY, AND THE FRUITS OF THE HARVEST

From the Holidays Around the World series

An overview of the modern African-American holiday.

This book arrives at a time when black people in the United States have had intraracial—some serious, some snarky—conversations about Kwanzaa’s relevance nowadays, from its patchwork inspiration that flattens the cultural diversity of the African continent to a single festive story to, relatedly, the earnest blacker-than-thou pretentiousness surrounding it. Both the author and consultant Keith A. Mayes take great pains—and in painfully simplistic language—to provide a context that attempts to refute the internal arguments as much as it informs its intended audience. In fact, Mayes says in the endnotes that young people are Kwanzaa’s “largest audience and most important constituents” and further extends an invitation to all races and ages to join the winter celebration. However, his “young people represent the future” counterpoint—and the book itself—really responds to an echo of an argument, as black communities have moved the conversation out to listen to African communities who critique the holiday’s loose “African-ness” and deep American-ness and moved on to commemorate holidays that have a more historical base in black people’s experiences in the United States, such as Juneteenth. In this context, the explications of Kwanzaa’s principles and symbols and the smattering of accompanying activities feel out of touch.

A good-enough introduction to a contested festivity but one that’s not in step with the community it’s for. (resources, bibliography, glossary, afterword) (Nonfiction. 5-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4263-2849-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: National Geographic Kids

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2017

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A delightful story of love and hope.

OUR SUBWAY BABY

Families are formed everywhere—including large metropolitan mass-transit systems!

Baby Kevin, initially known as “Danny ACE Doe,” was found in the New York City’s 14th Street subway station, which serves the A-C-E lines, by one of his future fathers, Danny. Kevin’s other father, Pete (author Mercurio), serves as the narrator, explaining how the two men came to add the newborn to their family. Readers are given an abridged version of the story from Danny and Pete’s point of view as they work to formally adopt Kevin and bring him home in time for Christmas. The story excels at highlighting the determination of loving fathers while still including realistic moments of hesitation, doubt, and fear that occur for new and soon-to-be parents. The language is mindful of its audience (for example using “piggy banks” instead of “bank accounts” to discuss finances) while never patronizing young readers. Espinosa’s posterlike artwork—which presents the cleanest New York readers are ever likely to see—extends the text and makes use of unexpected angles to heighten emotional scenes and moments of urgency. The diversity of skin tones, ages, and faces (Danny and Pete both present white, and Kevin has light brown skin) befits the Big Apple. Family snapshots and a closing author’s note emphasize that the most important thing in any family is love. (This book was reviewed digitally with 11.3-by-18-inch double-page spreads viewed at 43% of actual size.)

A delightful story of love and hope. (Informational picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 15, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-525-42754-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2020

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more