Really? (Board book. 2-4)

READ REVIEW

BABY LOVES QUARKS!

From the Baby Loves series

This board book attempts to introduce babies to nuclear physics; its companion volume does the same with aerodynamics.

A white baby in overalls is depicted building a tower with blocks. Moving right along, Spiro explains that nature also likes to build, and while baby builds with blocks, nature builds with quarks. So far so good, but now comes the confounding part. A quark is an elementary particle and a fundamental constituent of matter, but explaining it to a baby is no elementary matter. How does one explain something that’s not directly observed to young children developmentally not ready for abstraction? Conceivably, babies could learn to parrot the explanation of a quark, making their parents very proud and eager to show off their young prodigies, yet they would have absolutely no understanding of what they are saying. The companion volume to this book, Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering! is no less absurd in its subject matter. Though not as abstract, an understanding of aerodynamics does require a greater experience of the world than babies bring to the table. There will be time enough for children to learn, experience, and understand these concepts when they are a little older; meanwhile, what happened to head, shoulders, knees, and toes?

Really? (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Oct. 4, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-58089-540-8

Page Count: 20

Publisher: Charlesbridge

Review Posted Online: Oct. 12, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2017

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While the likely answer is no, this offering is still a visually captivating delight for careful little ones. (Board book....

ALPHABLOCK

From the Block Books series

In this ABC book, shaped pages lead readers to corresponding objects.

The usual alphabet objects are presented here in the straightforward text: “A IS FOR... // APPLE.” The graphically appealing design devotes two double-page spreads to each letter. In the first spread, the right-hand side is a full-size, die-cut letter, while the left depicts a scene. A portion of the object, animal or person the featured letter stands for peeks through the die-cut openings; a cheery, red octopus smiles through the hole of the “O,” and the tail of a fish is visible from behind the “F.” Once the letter/page is turned, the background from the previous left-hand page blends seamlessly with the full double-page spread that’s revealed. The visual hints provide a playful guessing game for young readers, with a nice balance of the easily recognizable (the nose of a train emerges from behind the “T”) to the slightly more challenging (the handle of a pair of scissors sticks out from the middle of the “S”). With a pleasing, retro feel, Peskimo’s art uses bold colors in a slightly muted hue and the weathered look of woodblock prints. The book’s construction is the only real concern, as 104 board pages are a lot for any binding. Will the die-cut letters survive the vigorous page turns of doubtless eager readers?

While the likely answer is no, this offering is still a visually captivating delight for careful little ones. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Aug. 6, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4197-0936-4

Page Count: 104

Publisher: abramsappleseed

Review Posted Online: Aug. 14, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2014

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While the puzzle gimmick may hold youngsters' interest for a few readings, it is unlikely to have a long shelf life.

PANTONE COLOR PUZZLES

6 COLOR-MATCHING PUZZLES

Another overdesigned board book, with puzzle pieces this time, from PANTONE, the company that creates the widely used color matching system.

Each double-page spread focuses on one color of the rainbow. The left-hand side is a full-page, graphically minded scene using a variety of hues of the color in question. On the facing pages, the PANTONE chips make their appearance, four shades occupying the four quadrants of the page separated by a bold white line in typical PANTONE fashion. Both sides of each page spread carry four shaped indentations to hold abstract puzzle shapes made of paperboard. Featuring machines that go on the left, the red spread has pieces that become the door and siren on a fire truck. These same pieces fit into slots labeled “Stop Sign Red / PANTONE 485” and “Brick Red / PANTONE 7627” on the right. While the cartoon tableaux are droll, the use of PANTONE numbers will make little sense to youngsters. The puzzle pieces themselves are relatively easy to get in and out once loosened, but, after a few readings, they will likely flake at the edges if they are not lost altogether. The small pieces force this message on the back cover: “WARNING: CHOKING HAZARD—Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.”

While the puzzle gimmick may hold youngsters' interest for a few readings, it is unlikely to have a long shelf life. (Board book. 3-4)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4197-0939-5

Page Count: 12

Publisher: abramsappleseed

Review Posted Online: Sept. 25, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2014

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