An adequate color and flowers concept book with an exuberant cast of characters.

READ REVIEW

PENGUINS LOVE COLORS

Using six baby penguins covered in paint, Aspinall introduces colors and flowers in this bright-eyed book.

With babies named Tulip, Tiger Lily, Dandelion, Violet, Bluebell, and Broccoli, Mama Penguin must love flowers. (A note on the copyright page clarifies that broccoli is indeed a flower.) Her six wide-eyed, black-and-white baby penguins are indistinguishable except for their berets, each representing the color of its flowery name. Tulip wears a red beret, Tiger Lily’s is orange, and so on. With the energy and good intentions of youngsters on a special day, the clan decides to surprise Mama with a gift. “Let’s use our paints and make the most colorful picture we can!” Aspinall then zooms in close to bold, double-paged spreads of each penguin and the rich color it is using. Six baby penguins in rainbow colors is a beautiful sight. However, the storyline is easily anticipated, with painting, messy babies, and a bath. The concept of color mixing is absent, which seems impossible with little ones. The focus instead turns to the flowers, showing each bloom labeled and silhouetted in one single color. Mama Penguin, bundling her rainbow babies to her, exults, “I love flowers, and I love colors, but not as much as I love… / …my six little penguins.”

An adequate color and flowers concept book with an exuberant cast of characters. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 25, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-545-87654-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Blue Sky/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: July 20, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2016

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Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it.

YOUR BABY'S FIRST WORD WILL BE DADA

A succession of animal dads do their best to teach their young to say “Dada” in this picture-book vehicle for Fallon.

A grumpy bull says, “DADA!”; his calf moos back. A sad-looking ram insists, “DADA!”; his lamb baas back. A duck, a bee, a dog, a rabbit, a cat, a mouse, a donkey, a pig, a frog, a rooster, and a horse all fail similarly, spread by spread. A final two-spread sequence finds all of the animals arrayed across the pages, dads on the verso and children on the recto. All the text prior to this point has been either iterations of “Dada” or animal sounds in dialogue bubbles; here, narrative text states, “Now everybody get in line, let’s say it together one more time….” Upon the turn of the page, the animal dads gaze round-eyed as their young across the gutter all cry, “DADA!” (except the duckling, who says, “quack”). Ordóñez's illustrations have a bland, digital look, compositions hardly varying with the characters, although the pastel-colored backgrounds change. The punch line fails from a design standpoint, as the sudden, single-bubble chorus of “DADA” appears to be emanating from background features rather than the baby animals’ mouths (only some of which, on close inspection, appear to be open). It also fails to be funny.

Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: June 9, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-250-00934-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

Review Posted Online: April 15, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2015

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Daddy-and-child dog lovers can try some of these canine ways of expressing affection.

DADDIES ARE AWESOME

Puppies celebrate the many ways their dads are awesome.

“Daddies are playful. / They swing you around. // You ride on their shoulders / or hang upside down.” The first spread pictures a scruffy pup, mouth clamped on its dad’s tail, hanging. The second features a long dachshund, his four pups using the large expanse of his back as a jungle gym or resting spot. The husky dad is labeled as daring, brave, and strong, while the hound takes his pup on adventures (digging and hiding under a bush). Other dog dads give kisses and tickles, tell bedtime stories and help count sheep (a stuffed toy), and help their pups grow (challenging them with stairs and carrying them when the going gets tough). Lovšin creatively interprets some of the text that applies well to kids but not so well to canines: dad and pup at each end of a long stick held in their mouths is the dog equivalent of holding hands. Though many dog breeds will be familiar, some are just mutts, though all are shown caring for and enjoying the company of their offspring. White backgrounds keep the focus on the dogs.

Daddy-and-child dog lovers can try some of these canine ways of expressing affection. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: May 17, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-62779-452-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: March 16, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2016

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