IF IT MAKES YOU HEALTHY

MORE THAN 100 DELICIOUS RECIPES INSPIRED BY THE SEASONS

The popular singer joins forces with her personal chef to share nutritious, seasonal dishes.

Crow remembers the delicious “Midwestern fare” her mother served when she was growing up, but as a busy, successful artist, her diet consisted of dressing-room junk food and room service. A breast cancer diagnosis in 2006 became the life-altering “game-changer” that spurred her to adopt a diet rich in sustainable, organic foods. Joined by her longtime personal chef Chuck White, the cookbook’s multifaceted recipe sections are grouped by seasons: Items like stuffed avocados, Southern Cobb Salad, Pecan-Crusted Trout and Lemon-Vanilla Panna Cotta are spring and summer tour favorites, while winter months spent in the studio feature Warm Hummus Soup, Barley and Vegetable Risotto, Five-Spiced Pork Tenderloin and her Mom’s Reconstructed Chili. Many of the recipes are supplemented by Crow and White’s smart, appealing cooking and food recommendations (ceviche, country ham, quinoa), along with quick factoids on everything from wasabi to grass-fed beef from Crow’s former dietitian Rachel Beller. Crow doesn’t deny herself the “10 percent cheat zone” and guiltlessly indulges in desserts like Vegan Chocolate-Mint Brownies and Banana Bread Pudding. Each section is clear and well organized, accented by generous photographs of the finished products and of Crow in the kitchen, on the road and alongside her two adopted sons. Brimming with easy, nourishing recipes, food tips and personal anecdotes, Crow’s recipe book should garner new appreciation from fans, foodies and cancer survivors.

 

Pub Date: April 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-312-65895-3

Page Count: 272

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: April 4, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2011

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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IN MY PLACE

From the national correspondent for PBS's MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour: a moving memoir of her youth in the Deep South and her role in desegregating the Univ. of Georgia. The eldest daughter of an army chaplain, Hunter-Gault was born in what she calls the ``first of many places that I would call `my place' ''—the small village of Due West, tucked away in a remote little corner of South Carolina. While her father served in Korea, Hunter-Gault and her mother moved first to Covington, Georgia, and then to Atlanta. In ``L.A.'' (lovely Atlanta), surrounded by her loving family and a close-knit black community, the author enjoyed a happy childhood participating in activities at church and at school, where her intellectual and leadership abilities soon were noticed by both faculty and peers. In high school, Hunter-Gault found herself studying the ``comic-strip character Brenda Starr as I might have studied a journalism textbook, had there been one.'' Determined to be a journalist, she applied to several colleges—all outside of Georgia, for ``to discourage the possibility that a black student would even think of applying to one of those white schools, the state provided money for black students'' to study out of state. Accepted at Michigan's Wayne State, the author was encouraged by local civil-rights leaders to apply, along with another classmate, to the Univ. of Georgia as well. Her application became a test of changing racial attitudes, as well as of the growing strength of the civil-rights movement in the South, and Gault became a national figure as she braved an onslaught of hostilities and harassment to become the first black woman to attend the university. A remarkably generous, fair-minded account of overcoming some of the biggest, and most intractable, obstacles ever deployed by southern racists. (Photographs—not seen.)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1992

ISBN: 0-374-17563-2

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1992

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