A sad but ultimately hopeful story of learning to love oneself.

READ REVIEW

EAT, AND LOVE YOURSELF

Can self-love be packaged in a chocolate bar?

Mindy is a young woman with body dysmorphia who finds emotional comfort in eating. Lately she has been feeling depressed—unhappy with her body and unsure about her life and future. One day, at her neighborhood corner store, Mindy purchases on impulse a chocolate bar with a label reading “Eat and Love Yourself.” She discovers that each bite transports her to a time in her past. Readers, along with Mindy, get to watch pivotal moments in her younger years when she endured derisive comments and bullying around weight and food that led to her struggles with low self-esteem and disordered eating. Throughout the story, readers observe Mindy coping with the negative feelings resulting from these interactions—some, painfully, with loved ones—and they witness her present-day journey to self-acceptance, self-advocacy, and openness to love. The illustrations are vivid yet subdued, with a jewel-toned palette that manages to evoke warmth in a story that deals with sharp, uncomfortable realities. The writing and artwork complement each other and serve to make the reading experience more immersive. Boo’s graphic novel reads as realistic despite involving time travel, and readers will find themselves rooting for Mindy as she relives deeply hurtful experiences. Mindy and her family are light-skinned and racially ambiguous, and there is ethnic diversity in secondary characters.

A sad but ultimately hopeful story of learning to love oneself. (Graphic fiction. 12-adult)

Pub Date: April 21, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-68415-506-4

Page Count: 160

Publisher: BOOM! Box

Review Posted Online: Feb. 26, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2020

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Even so, this remains Macbeth, arguably the Bard of Avon’s most durable and multilayered tragedy, and overall, this enhanced...

MACBETH

From the Wordplay Shakespeare series

A pairing of the text of the Scottish Play with a filmed performance, designed with the Shakespeare novice in mind.

The left side of the screen of this enhanced e-book contains a full version of Macbeth, while the right side includes a performance of the dialogue shown (approximately 20 lines’ worth per page). This granular focus allows newcomers to experience the nuances of the play, which is rich in irony, hidden intentions and sudden shifts in emotional temperature. The set and costuming are deliberately simple: The background is white, and Macbeth’s “armor” is a leather jacket. But nobody’s dumbing down their performances. Francesca Faridany is particularly good as a tightly coiled Lady Macbeth; Raphael Nash-Thompson gives his roles as the drunken porter and a witch a garrulousness that carries an entertainingly sinister edge. The presentation is not without its hiccups. Matching the video on the right with the text on the left means routinely cutting off dramatic moments; at one point, users have to swipe to see and read the second half of a scene’s closing couplet—presumably an easy fix. A “tap to translate” button on each page puts the text into plain English, but the pop-up text covers up Shakespeare’s original, denying any attempts at comparison; moreover, the translation mainly redefines more obscure words, suggesting that smaller pop-ups for individual terms might be more meaningful.

Even so, this remains Macbeth, arguably the Bard of Avon’s most durable and multilayered tragedy, and overall, this enhanced e-book makes the play appealing and graspable to students . (Enhanced e-book. 12 & up)

Pub Date: Sept. 9, 2013

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: The New Book Press LLC

Review Posted Online: Nov. 7, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2013

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If you’re going to read one graphic novel this year, make it this one.

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NIMONA

A not-so-bad villain fighting against a not-so-good hero teams up with a spunky shape-shifting heroine in a cleverly envisioned world.

Nimona, a plucky, punk-tressed girl, is determined to be the sidekick of the nefarious (in name only) Ballister Blackheart, the sworn enemy of the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics and their sporran-sporting champion, Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin. Blackheart, intrigued by Nimona's moxie and ability to shape-shift, takes her on, and the two decide they're going to take down the Institution. Nimona and Blackheart learn that the supposedly benevolent Institution has been hoarding a great quantity of a poisonous plant, jaderoot. As they delve deeper into its inner workings, they soon find that the lines that separate good and evil aren't simply black and white. Stevenson's world is fascinating: an anachronistic marvel that skillfully juxtaposes modern conventions against a medieval backdrop. Imbued with humor, her characters are wonderfully quirky and play with many of the archetypes found in comics. The relationships among her characters are complex and compelling: for an antihero, Blackheart dislikes killing and mayhem, while Goldenloin is not averse to cheating and trickery. Stevenson's portrayal of the relationship between good and evil is particularly ingenious, as is her attention to detail and adroit worldbuilding.

If you’re going to read one graphic novel this year, make it this one. (Graphic fantasy. 13 & up)

Pub Date: May 19, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-06-227823-4

Page Count: 272

Publisher: HarperTeen

Review Posted Online: March 3, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2015

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