LITTLE RABBIT GOES TO SLEEP

The little rabbit tries to go to sleep—he counts mosquitoes (one) and the feet of mice scurrying in the rafters (it can't be done: too many) and tries to ignore the scary dark; but finally he creeps down to the porch, where Grandpa's rocking chair is creaking. Then, while the old rabbit cuddles the younger one in his lap, they chat comfortably about stars, the rising moon, and chirping crickets, until the night is no longer scary and Grandpa can tuck the little one in, to snore ``as softly as one little mosquito.'' Johnston's deftly phrased text is genial and unusually engaging, while Stevenson captures the summer night in peaceful purples, blues, and greens. His bunnies are wonderfully expressive and appealing, while dozens of pleasurable details add interest—fabric designs featuring veggies popular with rabbits, the mosquito's shadow, nightshirted mice. A charming bedtime book that should be with us for years to come. (Picture book. 2-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 30, 1994

ISBN: 0-06-021239-X

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 1993

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SAY HELLO!

Today Carmelita visits her Abuela Rosa, but to get there she must walk. Down Ninth Avenue she strolls with her mother and dog. Colorful shops and congenial neighbors greet them along the way, and at each stop Carmelita says hello—in Spanish, Arabic, Hebrew and more. With a friendly “Jambo” for Joseph, a “Bonjour” at the bakery and an affectionate “Hey” for Max and Angel, the pig-tailed girl happily exercises her burgeoning multilingual skills. Her world is a vibrant community, where neighborliness, camaraderie and culture are celebrated. Isadora’s collaged artwork, reminiscent of Ezra Jack Keats, contains lovely edges and imperfections, which abet the feeling of an urban environment. Skillfully, she draws with her scissors, the cut-paper elements acting as her line work. Everything has a texture and surface, and with almost no solid colors, the city street is realized as a real, organic place. Readers will fall for the sociable Carmelita as they proudly learn a range of salutations, and the artist’s rich environment, packed with hidden details and charming animals, will delight readers with each return visit. Simply enchanting. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: April 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-399-25230-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: Dec. 23, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2010

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GO AWAY, BIG GREEN MONSTER!

By turning these stiff, die-cut pages, even very young children can assemble a green monster with "two big yellow eyes...a long blue nose...[and] a big red mouth with sharp white teeth..." and then make it go away again, feature by feature. Emberley, a Caldecott medalist whose delightful drawing books demonstrate a combination of rudimentary forms to create a world of images, uses simple shapes in bright colors to build a scowling, cartoonish face that seems to float against the solid black field- -scary, but deliciously so. A satisfying game that may also allay some nighttime fears. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: April 1, 1993

ISBN: 0-316-23653-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 1993

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