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THE COLOR OF HOMEOWNERSHIP

INCREASING WEALTH IN BLACK AND BROWN COMMUNITIES

A useful primer on the benefits of homeownership to low-income communities.

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In this guide, a financial adviser points to homeownership as the key to increasing generational wealth in Black and brown communities.

With a Ph.D. in psychology, Brown is well aware of the motivations behind how people spend or save their money. In addition to this academic background, this work draws on her own personal and family experiences with homeownership, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy as an African American woman. Too many individuals, she argues, are plagued with “acid reflux” in their pockets. As the adage goes, most of what they earn burns a hole in their pockets. If people want to live the “Post Pandemic American Dream” of “Credit Cards, Cash, and Cadillacs,” the author emphasizes they must become financially savvy in researching investment trends such as cryptocurrency, attending college, and, most importantly, buying a house, which would “impact the generations to come.” Brown is the founder and owner of Fresh Community Development Inc., an organization devoted to providing affordable financial literature and services to low-income families; this guide is an important addition to her reference materials. At just over 100 pages, this concise volume provides practical advice on the benefits of property ownership versus rent as well as sensible, if basic, tips on how to save, spend, and invest, irrespective of one’s economic class. Though there is certainly a racial component to the narrative that emphasizes ownership as a key to assuaging generational poverty, the book does not dwell on the historical contexts or systemic barriers to the purchase of a home. While it offers crucial information to understanding American residential history, this volume is not intended as an indictment of capitalism or racism. Instead, the author is laser focused on individual responsibility and actions where “we all have a role to play” in alleviating poverty. Brown’s conversational prose style borrows heavily from the inspirational lingo of self-help books. In addition, the manual delivers ample references to pop culture, zodiac signs, and Christianity designed to motivate and educate readers to reconsider their spending habits and financial goals.

A useful primer on the benefits of homeownership to low-income communities.

Pub Date: Dec. 31, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-73513-323-2

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Success Lockdown Group LLC

Review Posted Online: Jan. 24, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2022

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  • New York Times Bestseller

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UNCOMFORTABLE CONVERSATIONS WITH A JEW

An important dialogue at a fraught time, emphasizing mutual candor, curiosity, and respect.

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Two bestselling authors engage in an enlightening back-and-forth about Jewishness and antisemitism.

Acho, author of Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man, and Tishby, author of Israel: A Simple Guide to the Most Misunderstood Country on Earth, discuss many of the searing issues for Jews today, delving into whether Jewishness is a religion, culture, ethnicity, or community—or all of the above. As Tishby points out, unlike in Christianity, one can be comfortably atheist and still be considered a Jew. She defines Judaism as a “big tent” religion with four main elements: religion, peoplehood, nationhood, and the idea of tikkun olam (“repairing the world through our actions”). She addresses candidly the hurtful stereotypes about Jews (that they are rich and powerful) that Acho grew up with in Dallas and how Jews internalize these antisemitic judgments. Moreover, Tishby notes, “it is literally impossible to be Jewish and not have any connection with Israel, and I’m not talking about borders or a dot on the map. Judaism…is an indigenous religion.” Acho wonders if one can legitimately criticize “Jewish people and their ideologies” without being antisemitic, and Tishby offers ways to check whether one’s criticism of Jews or Zionism is antisemitic or factually straightforward. The authors also touch on the deteriorating relationship between Black and Jewish Americans, despite their historically close alliance during the civil rights era. “As long as Jewish people get to benefit from appearing white while Black people have to suffer for being Black, there will always be resentment,” notes Acho. “Because the same thing that grants you all access—your skin color—is what grants us pain and punishment in perpetuity.” Finally, the authors underscore the importance of being mutual allies, and they conclude with helpful indexes on vernacular terms and customs.

An important dialogue at a fraught time, emphasizing mutual candor, curiosity, and respect.

Pub Date: April 30, 2024

ISBN: 9781668057858

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Simon Element

Review Posted Online: March 13, 2024

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2024

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GREENLIGHTS

A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

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All right, all right, all right: The affable, laconic actor delivers a combination of memoir and self-help book.

“This is an approach book,” writes McConaughey, adding that it contains “philosophies that can be objectively understood, and if you choose, subjectively adopted, by either changing your reality, or changing how you see it. This is a playbook, based on adventures in my life.” Some of those philosophies come in the form of apothegms: “When you can design your own weather, blow in the breeze”; “Simplify, focus, conserve to liberate.” Others come in the form of sometimes rambling stories that never take the shortest route from point A to point B, as when he recounts a dream-spurred, challenging visit to the Malian musician Ali Farka Touré, who offered a significant lesson in how disagreement can be expressed politely and without rancor. Fans of McConaughey will enjoy his memories—which line up squarely with other accounts in Melissa Maerz’s recent oral history, Alright, Alright, Alright—of his debut in Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused, to which he contributed not just that signature phrase, but also a kind of too-cool-for-school hipness that dissolves a bit upon realizing that he’s an older guy on the prowl for teenage girls. McConaughey’s prep to settle into the role of Wooderson involved inhabiting the mind of a dude who digs cars, rock ’n’ roll, and “chicks,” and he ran with it, reminding readers that the film originally had only three scripted scenes for his character. The lesson: “Do one thing well, then another. Once, then once more.” It’s clear that the author is a thoughtful man, even an intellectual of sorts, though without the earnestness of Ethan Hawke or James Franco. Though some of the sentiments are greeting card–ish, this book is entertaining and full of good lessons.

A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-593-13913-4

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Oct. 27, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2020

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