A comfortable bedtime story that will help send little ones (and maybe grownups) off to sleep.

READ REVIEW

THE SUN GOES TO BED

This simple bedtime story succeeds with the help of lovely art, soothing narration and well-chosen interactive effects.

The sun works very hard during the day, so when night approaches, it’s tired and ready for bed. As it sets, it looks back on the work it’s done, “[b]eaming rays to help everything grow. / Spreading health through a soft, warm glow.” The poetry is simple but generally effective (aside from a few awkward moments), with the illustrations in soothing purples, oranges and greens providing a big assist. The satisfying interactive effects include turning lights on in dark windows, sending an army of ants scurrying along twisting paths and tucking flower petals in on themselves. At the end of the story, the sun slips under the covers next to a sleeping child. The app provides a handy slide-navigation bar at the bottom of each page and an autoplay option. The female narrator has a soothing British accent, and words are highlighted as she speaks. Unfortunately, an option to record the book with the user’s voice resulted in the app repeatedly crashing, an effect that one hopes will be fixed in a future update.

A comfortable bedtime story that will help send little ones (and maybe grownups) off to sleep. (iPad storybook app. 2-5)

Pub Date: Dec. 22, 2011

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Touchoo

Review Posted Online: Feb. 15, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2012

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It’s sweet, but it thematically (and eponymously) replicates Dan Pinto and Benn Sutton’s Hedgehug (2011)—with much less verve

HEDGEHUGS

How do you hug if you’re a hedgehog?

Horace and Hattie are best friends who like to spend time together making daisy chains, splashing in puddles, and having tea parties. But they are OK doing things on their own, too: Hattie dances in the bluebells, while Horace searches the woods for spiders. But no matter what they do, together or apart, there’s one thing that they’ve found impossible: hugging. Each season, they try something new that will enable them to cushion their spines and snuggle up. Snow hugs are too cold, hollow-log hugs are too bumpy, strawberry hugs are too sticky, and autumn-leaf hugs are too scratchy. But a chance encounter with some laundry drying on a line may hold the answer to their problem—as well as to the universal mystery of lost socks. Tapper’s illustrations are a mix of what appears to be digital elements and photographed textures from scraps of baby clothes. While the latter provide pleasing textures, the hedgehogs are rendered digitally. Though cute, they are rather stiff and, well, spiky. Also, the typeface choice unfortunately makes the D in “hedgehug” look like a fancy lowercase A, especially to those still working on their reading skills.

It’s sweet, but it thematically (and eponymously) replicates Dan Pinto and Benn Sutton’s Hedgehug (2011)—with much less verve . (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-62779-404-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: Sept. 21, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2015

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THE I LOVE YOU BOOK

“I love you when you are scared. / I love you when you are brave. / I love you when I am away. / I love you when we are cuddled up close.” A characteristically multicolored cast of parents strings together declarative sentences to describe all the conditions under which they love their children, ending with, “Most of all, I love you just the way you are.” Parr’s entry in the Valentine’s Day sweepstakes looks like every other one of his books—childlike figures with heavy black outlines, bright primary hues with little regard to real coloration—and sounds like 90 percent of the rest of the “I love you” books. Ho-hum. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-316-01985-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Megan Tingley/Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2008

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