RUMBLES LEFT AND RIGHT by William F. Buckley Jr.

RUMBLES LEFT AND RIGHT

A BOOK ABOUT TROUBLESOME PEOPLE AND IDEAS

KIRKUS REVIEW

William F. Buckley, Jr., who dissipated his power to shock in his first book, God And Man At Yale, here discusses such figures as Norman Mailer and Adam Clayton Powell; such matters as progressive eduction; and such problems as integration. That is to say, he swats gnats with a sledge hammer; kicks a dead horse; and shoots fish in a barrel. There is also a hymn to Barry Goldwater and a dirge for Whittaker chambers. His essay on Khrushchev's visit to the United States must stand as the ast cry for the comforts of the walled city. An outline of his TV appearance on ack Paar's show and his close analysis of a series of columns by Murray Kempton rate some sort of award for documented, unintentional humor. There are four essays outside politics -- on sailing; a plea for clear speech; his travel sores in Japan and a call to Americans to begin complaining loudly about the minor irritations of transport and personal service. These last fit the Buckley style more comfortably than do the political essays -- for which he is noted wherever the Right meet to right. Major advertising is planned and (no matter what anyone has to say about it) the book will sell -- it's an author stimulated audience via TV and his magazine.
Pub Date: April 12th, 1963
ISBN: 1245552740
Publisher: Putnam
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1st, 1963




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