Readers receptive to unconventional curative approaches should find much to ponder in this referential, instructional, and...

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POWER TOOLS FOR HEALTH

HOW PULSED MAGNETIC FIELDS (PEMFS) HELP YOU

A Baltimore family physician extols the virtues of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy and its positive effects on the human body in this debut book.

Writing collaboratively with freelance editor Layne, Pawluk shares his frustration with traditional medicine and, after studying acupuncture, his introduction to static magnet and electromagnetic field therapy. He researched it and, years later, applied it within his scope of practice. A holistically trained professional, Pawluk believes in treating illnesses via their root causes, and the peer-reviewed PEMF studies he presents demonstrate dramatic results in accelerating organ healing and improving basic physical functionality. He aims to garner outward support for this revolutionary therapy through the testimonies and focused information provided in this book. The guide is cohesive, tightly written, and organized into five sections collectively illuminating everything from basic introductory facts to the therapy’s effects on disease and dysfunction. The complex operating science and performance attributes behind PEMF are thoroughly explained, though perhaps using overly clinical terminology that may prove challenging for laypeople. Still, while details on modulation, wavelength cycles, frequencies, and entrainment threaten to confuse at the outset, a condensed summary page (which appears at the conclusion of each chapter) is immensely helpful and boils the information down to a more manageable nugget for neophytes. The guide expands further to include how PEMFs help the body and complement other medical interventions while stressing the benefits gained from daily use of the therapy as “primary prevention” to achieve “constant energetic healing.” Pawluk touts the scientifically proven antibacterial, regenerative, cognitive, anti-inflammatory, and detoxifying properties of PEMF, and in the most expansive section, the book intricately details an incredibly copious amount of alphabetically arranged ailments that electromagnetic field therapy claims to alleviate. His study-supported claims run the gamut from benefiting addiction, arthritis, obesity, and back pain to more life-threatening conditions such as cancer and strokes. Though each claim is backed up with sound clinical evidence and details on the therapy’s mechanical functionalities, Pawluk responsibly recommends professional medical consultation before embarking on any new treatment. A closing section explains how to select and then safely and properly utilize the right PEMF system.

Readers receptive to unconventional curative approaches should find much to ponder in this referential, instructional, and supportive manual on a pioneering advance in modern medicine.

Pub Date: Nov. 29, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-5255-0762-5

Page Count: 418

Publisher: FriesenPress

Review Posted Online: Feb. 13, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2018

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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