Series: Alvin Ho


ALVIN HO by Lenore Look
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"Pack your bags and prepare to fly. (glossary) (Fiction. 6-10)"
Alvin Ho is at it again. Allergic to everything and all things girly, this 7-1/2-year-old worrywart hops a continent to visit relatives in Beijing. Is China ready for Alvin? Read full book review >
ALVIN HO by Lenore Look
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 9, 2013

"Alvin's excitable, first-person narration, replete with his realistic attempts to make sense of what he doesn't understand, will again infect readers with its goofiness. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Alvin Ho's lovable, quirky family is due to increase by one in this fifth installment of the warmly funny series, which again features vibrant, playful black-and-white illustrations by Pham. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"A fresh entry in what is overall an exceedingly enjoyable series; readers will cheer this latest. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Nervous second-grader Alvin Ho digs deep to find the bravery to attend a funeral in this playful and poignant fourth offering in the series. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 28, 2010

Back for a third adventure, anxious Alvin Ho faces such terrifying scenarios as a class visit to the houses of famous deceased authors in his Concord, Mass., hometown and negotiating the particulars of being invited to a girl's birthday party, even as he yearns to be invited to the shindig of another (male) classmate. As in the first two in the series, illustrator Pham's expressively appealing ink drawings add life, and Alvin proves an engaging narrator, whose imagination runs wild to hilarious effect. His likable, funny siblings and caring, if at times exasperated, parents are also along for the ride. Troubling in this volume, however, is that at the coveted boys' birthday party, everyone is dressing up as Indians and settlers, and Alvin figures his ticket is a "deluxe Indian Chief outfit." Although there is a brief note in the always-creative glossary regarding the colonization of Native peoples' land during King Philip's War, there is no textual mitigation of a running joke that seems anachronistic at best—readers may well be left feeling uncomfortable with the stereotype. (Fiction. 7-10)Read full book review >