Series: Lola & Leo


LOLA GOES TO SCHOOL by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 11, 2019

"Both perfect for Lola fans and likely to earn her ever more readers. (Picture book. 3-5)"
After years of everyday joys with McQuinn and Beardshaw's Lola, readers now watch her start school. Read full book review >
LEO GETS A CHECKUP by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 11, 2018

"A helpful way to prepare toddlers for a visit to the doctor with a character who's easy to love. (Picture book. 1-3)"
In this episode in the life of toddler Leo, younger brother to Lola (Lola Reads to Leo, 2012, etc.), his parents take him to the doctor's office for a checkup. Read full book review >
LOLA GETS A CAT by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This sweet story of first-time pet ownership is sure to appeal to young animal lovers of all kinds and especially to feline fanciers. (Picture book. 3-5)"
McQuinn and Beardshaw's (Leo Can Swim, 2016, etc.) adorable, black preschool heroine, Lola, is back for another turn. Read full book review >
LOLA PLANTS A GARDEN by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"It's gratifying to see Lola's love of books leading her to new experiences. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Hoping to have a garden like the one in her poetry book, Lola plants seeds, waits and weeds, and finally celebrates with friends. Read full book review >
LEO LOVES BABY TIME by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 25, 2014

"Like Leo and his friends, this book is a buoyant and bouncy delight. (Picture book. 6-18 mos.)"
Leo, who first appeared in Lola Reads to Leo (2012), attends a baby program with his mother. Read full book review >
LOLA READS TO LEO by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"A welcome edition about a welcome addition. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Bibliophile Lola has no trouble adjusting to her role as big sister in this warm slice-of-life story about a little girl welcoming her new baby brother. Read full book review >
LOLA LOVES STORIES by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2010

Lola's daddy takes her to the library every Saturday, where she finds "excellent books," and every night her mommy or daddy reads them to her. The next day Lola acts out the story. On Sunday she's a fairy princess; on Monday she takes her toy animals "on fantastic trips to places like Paris"; on Wednesday she's a tiger, etc. Each new book and day provides Lola with a variety of tales to play out, with the last one—which is about a wild monster—posing the question, "What will Lola be tomorrow?" The final page shows her in a wolf suit just like Max's. The library books, the pretending and the incorporation of the days of the week work together as a simple and pleasing premise. Beardshaw's acrylic illustrations depict the multicultural kids and Lola's black family with childlike charm, while the title will have librarians, parents and booksellers smiling. Alert: The book will be an invitation for lap kids to follow Lola's lead—not such a bad thing. (Picture book. 3-5)Read full book review >
LOLA AT THE LIBRARY by Anna McQuinn
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2006

It's Tuesday: library day and Lola's favorite time of the weekly routine. At the library, Lola can visit "a special section . . . just for children," listen to stories, sing songs and select a new batch of books to borrow. While her mommy is not quite out of bed yet, Lola is ready to go with her own library card and backpack filled with books to return. This eager, happy toddler gives readers a complete tour of a conventional weekly visit to the library that includes, on the walk home, a snack of cappuccino for her mommy and juice for Lola. Beardshaw's vividly colored acrylic paintings of a mother and child's morning outing in their racially mixed neighborhood complements the classic library scenes charged with a child's vibrant enthusiasm. The simple, significant message will ring true with every librarian, teacher, caregiver and parent as the day concludes with Lola's nightly bedtime story. Everyone should begin and end the day with a good book. (Picture book. 2-5)Read full book review >