Books by Adam Gidwitz

THE CHUPACABRAS OF THE RÍO GRANDE by Adam Gidwitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 16, 2019

"An unsubtle and unengaging attempt to educate children on border issues. (Fantasy. 7-12)"
Uchenna and Elliot join Professor Fauna on a trip to the southern border to rescue the mythical chupacabras. Read full book review >
THE BASQUE DRAGON by Adam Gidwitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 10, 2018

"Not fantastic. (Fantasy. 7-10)"
Elliot and Uchenna, now full-fledged members of the Unicorn Rescue Society, are back for a second adventure following series opener The Creature of the Pines (2018). Read full book review >
THE CREATURE OF THE PINES by Adam Gidwitz
Released: April 10, 2018

"Fantasy training wheels for chapter-book readers. (Fantasy. 7-10)"
Elliot's first day of school turns out to be more than he bargained for. Read full book review >
THE INQUISITOR'S TALE by Adam Gidwitz
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A masterpiece of storytelling that is addictive and engrossing. (Fantasy. 11 & up)"
Gidwitz strikes literary gold with this mirthful and compulsively readable adventure story set in medieval France. Read full book review >
SO YOU WANT TO BE A JEDI? by Adam Gidwitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"An enthusiastic, mostly successful experiment to make old new again. (Science fantasy. 8-12)"
Gidwitz turns to second-person narration in his retelling of The Empire Strikes Back.Read full book review >
THE GRIMM CONCLUSION by Adam Gidwitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 8, 2013

"Entertaining story-mongering, with traditional and original tropes artfully intertwined. (Fantasy. 11-14)"
The names change, but the characters and themes not so much as Gidwitz takes a pair of children through a third series of folk-tale scenarios punctuated with washes of blood, fire, tears and parental issues that presage readers' encounters with Bruno Bettelheim. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2012

"Not so much a set of retellings as a creative romp through traditional and tradition-based story-scapes, compulsively readable and just as read-out-loudable. (source note) (Fantasy. 11-14)"
The author of A Tale Dark and Grimm (2010) starts over—sending young Jack and Jill on a fresh quest for self-knowledge through trials and incidents drawn (stolen, according to the author) from a diverse array of European folk and fairy tales. Read full book review >
A TALE DARK & GRIMM by Adam Gidwitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

Fairy tales for the horror set blend themselves into one intact thread that's satisfying enough to overcome an intrusive narrator. The storyteller's voice (presented in bold type) opens by asserting that original Grimm tales are "awesome," "violent and ... bloody," while "all the versions of the stories you've heard [are]… mind-numbingly boring" due to sanitization. It's an odd premise for a piece whose audience is surely aware of many fractured fairy tales that are dark and/or awesome. The narrator contributes unnecessary platitudes, but on the plus side, savvily warns when little kids should leave the room, effectively cautioning big kids that upcoming content is sad or gory—and it really is. Heads are lopped off, blood flows, men reach down girls' throats and pull out their souls. Old Grimm tales and Gidwitz's original additions weave together into one arc, with fiercely loyal siblings Hansel and Gretel at the heart. The narrator's presence lessens; action and emotion deepen; funny gross-outs pop up amid serious violence; and everything builds to one painful and triumphant catharsis. (Fractured fairy tale. 10-13)Read full book review >