Books by Adam Gopnik

A THOUSAND SMALL SANITIES by Adam Gopnik
Released: May 14, 2019

"Gopnik's learned, lofty, occasionally dense study ultimately reasserts the belief in the 'infinity of small effects.'"
The longtime New Yorker staff writer and prolific cultural critic once again shows his astute awareness of the public's political consciousness in this new work championing "liberalism." Read full book review >
AT THE STRANGERS' GATE by Adam Gopnik
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Not exactly a Horatio Alger story but an engaging tale of a writer finding his way in work and life."
A longtime New Yorker contributor writes about his early years in the city—the 1980s principally—ruminating about art and artists, love and apartments, writing and reading and speaking, and the city that he loves. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 4, 2011

"Rich in context and philosophical thoughts, Gopnik's book will satiate the most ardent of food-history buffs."
A philosophical look at French food and how it has affected our eating habits and our lives. Read full book review >
THE STEPS ACROSS THE WATER by Adam Gopnik
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

A little girl learns the meaning of family in this fantasy adventure loosely based on Andersen's "Snow Queen" and set in both New York City and a parallel metropolis called U Nork. Adopted from Russia, Rose is presciently attracted to snow globes and stories about snow princesses. Her urban-kid routine is shattered on an outing to the Empire State Building, where a diminutive spy from U Nork invites her to ascend a glass stairway across the water in Central Park to find the "biggest and grandest city in the solar system." Awed by the enormous buildings and bizarre customs, Rose discovers that U Nork is really hidden inside a snow globe and depends on her to save it from the demonic Ice Queen. With an assist from family and friends from both cities, spunky Rose faces some hard choices as she confronts the powerful Ice Queen—who just happens to be her real mother. While the highly original New York/U Nork construct proves fascinating, readers may find the overt "Snow Queen" correspondences intrusive, bewildering and misguided. (Fantasy. 8-12) Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 30, 2009

"Despite indulging in such bombastic statements as, 'all their angels are ages, and the ages held out a distant halo of angels,' this talented, skillful critic achieves considerable new, heartfelt depth."
The coincidence of a birthday shared by two titans of modern history yields an absorbing joint appreciation of the politics of emancipation, evolutionary science and their respective contributions to the world we know now. Read full book review >
THE KING IN THE WINDOW by Adam Gopnik
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

Gopnik's work for the New Yorker is beautiful and elegant, but he has fallen prey to the contemporary disease that condemns adult writers and celebrities—writing a children's book once they have children of their own; his overstuffed fantasy is next to impossible to endure. Somewhere under all the filler, there's a plot about an American boy living in Paris, who's mistaken by Window Wraiths for their titular king, expected to save them from the villainous One with None. Much is made of the difference between windows and mirrors—too much. Also overwhelming is the landslide of glop about Paris, in which the author helpfully supplies everything he knows about the city's history, science and culture. The 11-year-old hero is, of course, studying Molière (aren't all 11-year-olds?), who is one of the Wraiths, and his two sidekicks are such bland stereotypes of American and French children that putting one in a cowboy hat and the other in a beret would have been sufficient. Dozens of clear-as-glass or mirror-reflection references abound, and Gopnik would have done well to reflect a bit himself, since there are few 11-year-olds who will want to wallow through this murk. (Fantasy. 11-14)Read full book review >
PARIS TO THE MOON by Adam Gopnik
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 20, 2000

"Thanks for the postcards, Adam. Sounds like a wonderful time. Wish we were there. "
A talented essayist for the New Yorker pens a love letter to the City of Lights, praising Paris to the moon (though that's not the original meaning of the title). Read full book review >