Books by Alice Kaplan

ALGERIAN CHRONICLES by Albert Camus
Released: May 6, 2013

"A political footnote to a literary legacy."
In a manner less literary than journalistic but more personal than political, the Nobel Prize–winning existentialist argues for a liberal middle ground between French imperialism and the independence of his native Algeria. Read full book review >
THE INTERPRETER by Alice Kaplan
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 12, 2005

"Kaplan illuminates some abhorrent recent history that the Army would likely prefer to forget."
Justice for all? Not in the Jim Crow U.S. Army of WWII, as a French civilian discovered, to his horror. Read full book review >
PIANO MUSIC FOR FOUR HANDS by Roger Grenier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 19, 2001

"A big little novel, in every way."
A marvel of brevity, this superb 1991 novel by the French author of Another November (and many others as yet untranslated) encapsulates the fate of a small French village in the conflicted figure of Michel Mailhoc, a failed musician who teaches his young grandniece Emma to become the successful concert pianist he is not meant to be. Read full book review >
THE COLLABORATOR by Alice Kaplan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 2000

" An important contribution to modern French history."
The riveting tale of an episode, hardly known to Americans, that continues to affect French life and politics and raises profound moral issues. Read full book review >
FRENCH LESSONS by Alice Kaplan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"The major impression Kaplan gives here is of how very interesting life can be to a French professor, especially at a time when French intellectuals dominate academic critical thought— making this enjoyable reading for Francophiles, perhaps, but not for many others."
 ``What do students need to know about their teachers?'' asks Kaplan (French Literature/Duke; Reproductions of Banality, 1986, etc.—not reviewed): ``How do I tell them who I am, why I read the way I do?'' Here, the author is thinking of the mysteries of her own teacher, Paul de Man—but her memoir, though artful, hasn't the intellectual force or interest of de Man's writing. Read full book review >