Books by Albert Camus

ALGERIAN CHRONICLES by Albert Camus
Released: May 6, 2013

"A political footnote to a literary legacy."
In a manner less literary than journalistic but more personal than political, the Nobel Prize-winning existentialist argues for a liberal middle ground between French imperialism and the independence of his native Algeria. Read full book review >
THE FIRST MAN by Albert Camus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"All honor to Catherine Camus for offering us this invaluable glimpse into the life and art of a writer who may have been greater than we knew then or can know even now."
A voice we thought we'd never hear again speaks out with plangency and clarity in this unfinished novel, found in the wreckage of the car in which its Nobel Prize—winning author perished in 1960. Read full book review >
A HAPPY DEATH by Albert Camus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1972

"The fascination lies in comparing the two books: A Happy Death stands as a measure of The Stranger's sudden, artistic and philosophical maturity — and provides a rare, unguarded glimpse of the turbulence that was mastered."
This first of Knopf's Camus "cahiers," actually an unpublished novel from 1936-38, reveals a surprising Mersault-in-embryo. Read full book review >
LYRICAL AND CRITICAL ESSAYS by Albert Camus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 1968

"But Camus is more the measure of man and man's physical and spiritual union with the universe, however idealized."
In one of his nastier moods, Sartre accused Camus of writing like Chateaubriand. Read full book review >
NOTEBOOKS 1935-1942 by Albert Camus
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 1963

"A resolution to live within the limits of the possible, a tragic joy in a "univers absurd", these cahiers are relevant and revelatory, the journey of an era and a man."
In these posthumously published notebooks of Camus, written well before he was thirty, one can find the seeds for almost all the later works, from The Stranger and Caligula on to The Fall. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 13, 1960

"Certainly this is the most important book written about Camus, by one who knows best."
Biographically speaking, there is nothing as definitive concerning a man's life as the asides he speaks- to himself or while facing an audience. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 15, 1958

"Camus has his claque which creates an assumed audience."
Stuart Gilbert does the translation, and the author contributes an amusing, a little deprecatory, interpretative introduction to the four plays which were written between 1938 and 1950: Caligula, an "actor's and director's play"; The Misunderstanding, an attempt to create a modern tragedy; State of Siege, an allegory which was slashed by the critics; and The Just Assassins, more successful, which has its basis in history. Read full book review >
EXILE AND THE KINGDOM by Albert Camus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 10, 1957

"The stories have the purity, dignity and involution expected from Camus and will find their own critical audience."
...consists of six "short stories". Read full book review >
THE FALL by Albert Camus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1957

"But if in this case, Camus is the devil- his translator Justin O'Brien is a brilliant advocate."
An utterly fascinating book that might with half-truth be called a novel, or a monologue, or a character sketch, but which is largely a philosophical thesis, and inquiry- bristling with wit. Read full book review >
THE MYTH OF SISYPHUS by Albert Camus
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 26, 1955

"Largely for avant garde aesthetes and his special coterie."
This a book of earlier, philosophical essays concerned with the essential "absurdity" of life and the concept that- to overcome the strong tendency to suicide in every thoughtful man-one must accept life on its own terms with its values of revolt, liberty and passion. Read full book review >
THE REBEL by Albert Camus
HISTORY
Released: June 15, 1954

"This exploration into nihilism and rebellion in which Camus spins the globe of ideas to point out new and stimulating areas of thought will be appreciated by the literary and intellectual as an expression of contemporary thought in the world of letters on the world at large."
Albert Camus, esteemed author of The Plague, The Stranger, and other works outstanding in the contemporary literary scene, clarifies and expands his philosophy in an essay which is at least as literary as it is philosophical. Read full book review >
THE PLAGUE by Albert Camus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 1948

"It may command critical rather than popular attention."
By the Frenchman who, with Sartre, shares a leading position in European literature, this is a work of considerable significance and stature, distinguished by its clarity, its composure, and above all, its scrupulous classicism. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 8, 1876

"Even before opening the book, we know it is significant; we discover that it is also affecting and charming."
This is really two books: the first, a critical analysis of the literary and personal influences on the young Camus; the second, a selection of his unpublished writings—essay, prose, and verse—produced between the ages of 19 and 21. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR

"In a dehumanized era he held to "boyish" ideals, to giving to life courage, beauty, style."
Are the journals of writers really significant? Read full book review >