Books by Anton Chekhov

A NIGHT IN THE CEMETERY by Anton Chekhov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 14, 2008

"A splendidly lightweight collection whose satiric touch is so deft that it seems to be sending up a genre yet unborn."
Forty-two stories, many new to English-language readers, that reveal not only the range of the Russian master (1860-1904) but what crime stories were like before they became their own genre. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 16, 2004

"A heartening confirmation of the matchless skill and humanity of one of the true masters."
A welcome gathering of the great storywriter's atypical longer works, newly translated by the industrious pair who have previously offered fresh versions of Tolstoy, Gogol, and Dostoevsky. Read full book review >
THE STORY OF A NOBODY by Anton Chekhov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 2003

"A compact symphony of frustrated emotions, incompatibility and estrangement, destroyed dreams and bitter compromises: the very essence of Chekhov."
In this affecting (1892-93) novella, which shares many of the structural and tonal qualities of its author's later plays, an aging and ailing terrorist (the story's narrator) finds employment as a servant in a household promising access to the enemy he plans to assassinate: the "famous statesman" who is his employer Orlov's elderly father. Read full book review >
STORIES by Anton Chekhov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 7, 2000

"Probably the best one-volume Chekhov currently in print, and indispensable."
The acclaimed translating team who've provided lively new English versions of Dostoevsky's and Gogol's masterpieces now turn their attention to the best of all possible short-story writers. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"Still, even the juvenilia and ephemera of this writer constitute uniquely rewarding reading."
THE UNDISCOVERED CHEKHOV by Anton Chekhov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1998

"Translator Constantine's fine Introduction makes the best possible case for accepting even what are, at their weakest, mere ephemera into the glorious Chekhov canon."
Early tales rescued from the periodicals where they appeared in the 1880s, when the pseudonymous "Antosha Chekhonte" became the sole support of his indigent family. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 30, 1997

"Nonetheless, this correspondence gives us wonderfully vivid self-portraits of two important Russian artists and a poignant chronicle of love struggling against the handicap of distance and the ravages of terminal illness."
A moving and intimate epistolary record of the complex relationship between the great Russian playwright and the actress who eventually became his wife. Read full book review >
KASHTANKA by Anton Chekhov
by Anton Chekhov, translated by Ronald Meyer, illustrated by Gennady Spirin
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"They amplify and enlarge the tale: It's not a book, it's a performance. (Picture book. 8+)"
The heroine of Chekhov's short story is a dog who gets lost and is adopted by a clown. Read full book review >
KASHTANKA by Anton Chekhov
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 7, 1991

"Not essential, but good bookmaking. (Fiction/Picture book. 6-10)"
After the little dog Kashtanka is separated from her master, who spends the day wandering from customer to tavern to relative, she is taken in by a man who feeds her better than her master ever did and begins to train her: he's a clown whose act already includes a boar, a cat, and a goose. Read full book review >