Books by Chris Ware

Chris Ware lives in Chicago, Illinois, with his wife, Marnie. He is the author of Jimmy Corrigan — the Smartest Kid on Earth, which received the Guardian First Book Award in 2001 and was also included in the 2002 Whitney Biennial of American Art. He most


BUILDING STORIES by Chris Ware
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"A dazzling document, beautifully if most idiosyncratically drawn; in this iteration, sure to become a collector's item, though one that begs for an easier-to-handle trade edition."
A treasure trove of graphic artworks—they're too complex to be called comics—from Ware, master of angst, alienation, sci-fi and the crowded street. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS, 2007 by Chris Ware
Released: Oct. 10, 2007

""In short, I think this is absolutely great.""
In its second year, the annual anthology really hits its stride. Read full book review >
THE ACME NOVELTY LIBRARY by Chris Ware
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Another winner from Ware, up there with Jimmy Corrigan."
Like the cartoon equivalent of Willy Wonka—a graphic visionary opens the door to his creative factory with a wide-ranging anthology that conjures a world (if not a universe) unto itself. Read full book review >
WALT & SKEEZIX by Frank King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 2005

"A handsomely mounted presentation for one of the 20th-century's landmark cartoons."
First volume of a worthy project to reintroduce the world to the gang at Gasoline Alley. Read full book review >
JIMMY CORRIGAN by Chris Ware
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 5, 2000

"Everything here boggles: the artfully conceived foldout dust-jacket, the cryptically word-burdened endpapers, and, most of all, the story itself: a graphic narrative that deserves a place beside the best novels of the year. "
The comics world has amply rewarded Ware for his amazingly innovative work—he's won numerous prizes for his Acme Novelty Library, a combination of complex narratives about mice, a trove of visually arcane inventions (diagrammed with Rube Goldberg-like precision), and plenty of eye-straining text: a graphic self-effacement that echoes the creepy despair of Ware's main creation, Jimmy Corrigan. Read full book review >