Books by Christina Stead

THE BEAUTIES AND FURIES by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2017

"A welcome reissue of an intriguing, atmospherically rich work."
A woman leaves her husband in London for a younger man in Paris, where the affair takes unusual turns thanks to a conniving fellow the lovers befriend in this ambitious 1936 novel. Read full book review >
THE PUZZLEHEADED GIRL by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2017

"At shorter length, Stead reveals more clearly her gifts in tone and voice and building a scene, while her theme here puts these fictions among the Ur-texts of feminism."
The four novellas of this reissued 1967 book center on young women in the 1940s and '50s seeking to find themselves in a world looking to impose its own definitions. Read full book review >
A LITTLE TEA, A LITTLE CHAT by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2017

"Stead has created a fascinating precursor to Bellow's garrulous heroes and the little boy who takes on Wall Street in Gaddis' JR."
A sprawling character study that dissects a businessman working in Manhattan, bedding every woman he can, and talking incessantly, in this reissue of a 1948 work. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE HOTEL by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2017

"This is an excellent place for the Stead novice to begin enjoying her artistry."
The guests of a modest hotel in postwar Switzerland reveal their unsettled lives on a ravaged continent in this reissue of a masterful 1973 work. Read full book review >
LETTY FOX: HER LUCK by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 19, 2001

"Yes, there are 'occasional flashes of good writing' and 'bits of bitter humor,' but Stead's sixth novel is 'definitely fluff.'"
Best known for The Man Who Loved Children, Stead (1920-83) draws on the two central biographical facts of her life for this apparently amoral tale of modern play, work, and sex, first published in 1946: her sad childhood in Australia and her later life among the New York intellectual crowd. Read full book review >