Books by Christy Hale

AMAZING PLACES by Lee Bennett Hopkins
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"Amazing, indeed: American readers will come away both proud of what the country has to offer and eager to visit the sites in person. (Poetry. 6-11)"
This companion to Amazing Faces (2015) is a tribute to United States landmarks and adds illustrator Hale as a collaborator. Read full book review >
THE FORGIVENESS GARDEN by Lauren Thompson
Released: Oct. 30, 2012

"There are many possible paths to peace, but learning forgiveness is essential to all of them, as this book demonstrates. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Two villages separated by a stream and a history of anger wonder if they will ever stop fighting. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"This extraordinary new picture book masterfully tackles the complex task of contextualizing seemingly complex architectural concepts within a child's own world of play. (Informational picture book/poetry. 2-8)"
Hale turns her educated eye to modern and contemporary architecture and produces a book that is at once groundbreaking, child-friendly and marvelously inclusive. Read full book review >
THE EAST-WEST HOUSE by Christy  Hale
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"A welcome entrée to one artist's inspiration, aspiration and imagination. (Picture book/biography. 6-11)"
Born in the United States to an American mother and a Japanese father, Isamu (Japanese for "Mr. Courageous") traveled to his father's homeland when he was only two. Read full book review >
GUESS AGAIN! by Lillian Morrison
HUMOR
Released: April 1, 2006

"At times clever, but mostly unsatisfying, this just misses its mark. (Poetry. 6-9)"
More than 20 clever riddles keep the pages turning as two children make their way through their days. Read full book review >
SKY DANCERS by Connie Anna Kirk
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Kirk's research into Mohawk culture and the experience of Native steelworkers adds authenticity, making this a true-to-life portrait of family life and traditions. (Picture book. 7-10)"
Set in the 1930s, nonfiction author Kirk's debut picture book tells the story of John Cloud, a young Mohawk boy, and his relationship with his steelworker father, who is helping to build the Empire State Building. Read full book review >
ELIZABETI’S SCHOOL by Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Together, the talented team offers up another winning peek at a life that's different but the same. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In the beginning there was Elizabeti's Doll (1998), then, Mama Elizabeti (2000). Read full book review >
WHO’S IN THE HALL? by Betsy Hearne
FICTION
Released: Aug. 31, 2000

"It's the rhyming and word play, 'Wag and Wave and Willy-Nilly and Dizzy-Lizzy' that might keep the reader turning pages, because this mystery isn't very mysterious. (Picture book. 5-9)"
In this verbose picture book Hearne (Seven Brave Women, 1997 etc.) hits home the parental dictum, "don't open the door to strangers." Read full book review >
MAMA ELIZABETI by Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2000

"After supper, as Mama cradles Flora, Elizabeti rocks Obedi to sleep in her arms—a peaceful end to a trying, important day in her life. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Lightning doesn't strike twice, but this sweet sequel to the wonderful, award-winning Elizabeti's Doll (1998) will hit a chord in any child who has had to care for a younger sibling. Read full book review >
ELIZABETI'S DOLL by Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Stuve-Bodeen's debut is quirky but believable, lightly dusted with cultural detail, and features universal emotions in an unusual setting. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Charmed by her new baby brother, Elizabeti decides that she wants a baby of her own; she picks up a smooth rock, names it Eva and washes, feeds, and changes her, and carries her about in her cloth kanga. Read full book review >
JUAN BOBO AND THE PIG by Felix Pitre
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Perfect for sharing aloud. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
A Puerto Rican storyteller, now in New York, brings a catchy lilt to a story about a traditional figure well known as a simpleton. Read full book review >