Books by Colin Tudge

COLIN TUDGE is a three-time winner of the Glaxo/ABSW Science Writer of the Year Award. His career as a science writer includes serving as Features Editor at New Scientist , his own science program, Spectrum, on BBC Radio and freelance writing for The Inde


SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 20, 2009

"Entertaining, charming and knowledgeable."
A serious exploration of bird life from biologist Tudge (Feeding People Is Easy, 2007, etc.). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"Few books are as relevant for our time as is this one."
A tree-hugger extraordinaire offers myriad compelling reasons to admire, revere and—yes—hug the nearest trunk. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 2001

"An engaging and comprehensive analysis of genetic theory with occasional lapses into technophobia."
A sprawling exploration of genetic theory, as traced from Gregor Mendel's ideas of heredity and Charles Darwin's concept of evolution to today's biotechnologies. Read full book review >
THE SECOND CREATION by Ian Wilmut
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 2000

"An important book and impressive piece of science writing."
When Dolly, the cloned sheep, met the media in 1997, she unleashed a torrent of headlines, articles, editorials, and at least one book (Clone ,by Gina Kolata). Another after three years seems superfluous, but it's the one to read. Read full book review >
THE TIME BEFORE HISTORY by Colin  Tudge
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

A world survey course with a message: Change your attitude if you want Homo sapiens to survive another million years. Tudge (The Engineer in the Garden, p. 69, etc.) is an English science writer and broadcaster who soaks up data like a Pentium chip and is eager to disgorge all for the lay reader. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1995

An ambitious and evenhanded meditation on the science of genetics, its potential, and its ethical implications. Arguing that we must know where we came from to understand where we are going, British science journalist Tudge (Future Food, 1980) summarizes the history of genetics, starting with a somewhat dry and dutiful primer on evolution and molecular biology. Read full book review >