Books by Deborah Freedman

CARL AND THE MEANING OF LIFE by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 2019

"A pleasant, simplified examination of the significance of the lowly earthworm, just in time for garden encounters. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Earthworm Carl works busily underground, burrowing, eating, and depositing soil-enriching castings—until a field mouse asks, "Why?" Read full book review >
THIS HOUSE, ONCE by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Tender, comforting, and complex. (author's note) (Picture book. 3-8)"
Softly, poetically, an unseen narrator explores a house and what it is made of. Read full book review >
SHY by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"An exquisite treasure for bashful readers, animal lovers, and anyone who's ever wanted a friend. (Picture book. 3-7, adult)"
Someone extremely shy finds a friend. Read full book review >
BY MOUSE AND FROG by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 14, 2015

"An elegant, exuberant portrayal of stylistic differences and child-writer passion. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Mouse wants to tell a simple, gentle story, but Frog bounces in and stirs it up. Read full book review >
THE STORY OF FISH AND SNAIL by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 13, 2013

"This marvelous metabook shines in both concept and beauty. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Right from the title page, Freedman's latest makes a splash. Read full book review >
BLUE CHICKEN by Deborah Freedman
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 15, 2011

"Delicate and durable, visually sophisticated yet friendly: simply exquisite. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Breathtakingly beautiful meta-illustrations will draw many eyes to this tale of a curious chicken who spills some paint. Read full book review >
SCRIBBLE by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2007

Two children's drawings come to life in a clear case of, as the blurb so aptly puts it, "scribbling rivalry." After big sister Emma makes a slighting comment about her "scribble-kitty," Lucie covers Emma's slightly more elaborate picture of a sleeping princess in furious scrawls of crayon. When Scribble-Kitty decides to see what a Princess looks like, though, the tangle of scrawls becomes an obstacle, and it's only with help from a repentant Lucie that the lines are pulled aside into a neat coil. When Kitty reaches the Princess and kisses her, she wakes up and they decide to get married. Coming back into view, Emma protests that they can't—"But they did. And they all lived Happily Ever After. As drawings sometimes do." In panels that shift and overlap, the children are drawn realistically to keep the boundaries between real and play worlds separate—but like its ancestor Harold and the Purple Crayon, the unselfconscious (at least until the end) exploration of those boundaries here is liable to spark young imaginations. (Picture book. 5-7)Read full book review >