Books by Delia Sherman

THE FREEDOM MAZE by Delia Sherman
FANTASY
Released: Nov. 15, 2011

"Multilayered, compassionate and thought-provoking, a timely read on the sesquicentennial of America's Civil War. (Historical fantasy. 12 & up)"
It's 1960, but on the decayed Fairchild sugar plantation in rural Louisiana, vestiges of a grimmer past remain—the old cottage, overgrown garden maze, relations between white and black races. Read full book review >
THE MAGIC MIRROR OF THE MERMAID QUEEN by Delia Sherman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: June 1, 2009

"Still, the imaginative rendering of a familiar city populated by fictional characters and magical beings may be enough to entice readers to overlook the inside jokes and broad characterizations. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Sequel to Changeling (2006), the plot of this overlong fantasy is simple: A young human girl who has been raised by a magic white rat and a Pooka must find and return a magical talisman in order to save her Central Park home from danger. Read full book review >
THE FALL OF THE KINGS by Ellen Kushner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 5, 2002

"Immensely appealing, intelligent, and great fun."
Sequel to 1987's Swordspoint: A Melodrama of Manners, a tale set in an imaginary city that Kushner herself described as "not-quite-equal parts of Elizabethan London, 18th-century Paris, a dash of Regency of both, and even a little New York . . . . Read full book review >
THE ESSENTIAL BORDERTOWN by Terri  Windling
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Over to you."
Of that egregious title, readers might well demand: —Essential— to whom? Read full book review >
THE PORCELAIN DOVE by Delia Sherman
Released: May 6, 1993

"A dazzling display of period detail, and a slew of authentic- seeming characters—but all disappointingly held in thrall to a narrative that lumbers on to a by-now-longed-for end."
 Combining history, fairy tale, and period literary fashions, Sherman (the paperback Through a Brazen Mirror) offers a sprawling 18th-century epic that could be improved with some 20th-century editing. Read full book review >