Books by Delphine Durand

THE FLOPS by Delphine Durand
Released: July 16, 2019

"Fans of counterfactual flights will flip for this flamboyant fancy. (Informational picture book. 6-8)"
From France, an introduction to the amorphous species Flopus classicus and some of its blobby relatives. Read full book review >
AL PHA'S BET by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
ABC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2011

"A fresh take on a tried-and-true topic. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Less a traditional abecedary than an original pourquois tale, Rosenthal's latest asks the question, how did the alphabet come to be? Read full book review >
BIG RABBIT’S BAD MOOD by Ramona Badescu
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

Originally published in France, this odd, humorous tale about a rabbit's bad mood will leave readers scratching their heads but giggling nevertheless. Big Rabbit, an adult, has a "bad mood," personified as a big, gray, hairy creature following him around. Big Rabbit tries to remove it by turning on the radio, watching television, even calling his mom. But the bad mood stays and makes its presence known by doing funny, at times inappropriate things like appearing naked on television and picking his nose. As a last resort, Big Rabbit decides to draw arrows on the floor in hopes of leading the bad mood to the door, when his friends burst in for his surprise birthday party and the bad mood finally disappears. Durand's simple, quirky images are at their best depicting the bad mood's antics, which they do with gusto. It would be nice if all bad moods could be cured this way, but it's too bad Big Rabbit couldn't have ultimately gotten rid of it himself. Great concept, but in practice somewhat strange, and the adult sensibility could be alienating. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
THE CHICKEN OF THE FAMILY by Mary Amato
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

Henrietta's two older sisters teasingly tell her that she's really a chicken, then leave an egg and feathers around her bed as "proof." More than half-convinced, Henrietta leaves home for the nearest farm and, finding the company in the henyard surprisingly convivial, refuses to leave when her busted sisters arrive to fetch her back. Marching about on similarly stubby legs, Henrietta and the hens mingle peaceably in Durand's cartoon illustrations, and create such an idyllic playscape that one sister joins in (the other marches off in disgust). In a finale that rings true, the two are last seen strutting triumphantly homeward with big smiles on their faces, as the remaining sister faces the parental music. It's the most satisfying turn of the tables since Chris Van Allsburg's similarly themed Probuditi! (2006). (Picture book. 6-8)Read full book review >
THE CHICKEN OF THE FAMILY by Mary Amato
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

Henrietta's two older sisters teasingly tell her that she's really a chicken, then leave an egg and feathers around her bed as "proof." More than half-convinced, Henrietta leaves home for the nearest farm and, finding the company in the henyard surprisingly convivial, refuses to leave when her busted sisters arrive to fetch her back. Marching about on similarly stubby legs, Henrietta and the hens mingle peaceably in Durand's cartoon illustrations, and create such an idyllic playscape that one sister joins in (the other marches off in disgust). In a finale that rings true, the two are last seen strutting triumphantly homeward with big smiles on their faces, as the remaining sister faces the parental music. It's the most satisfying turn of the tables since Chris Van Allsburg's similarly themed Probuditi! (2006). (Picture book. 6-8)Read full book review >
THE HOUSE THAT JILL BUILT by Phyllis Root
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

Obsessive-compulsive flap-lifters will be particularly pleased by the multitude of tiny doors, windows and cupboards in this exercise in cumulative carpentry. Capable Jill and her feline assistant find themselves building room after room onto the cozy house they've just finished, as Little Jack Horner, Little Bo Peep, three kittens, a dish, a spoon and numerous other nursery-rhyme denizens arrive. The durable cut flaps stay put, but the scenes visible behind them change with each new spread, as new residents meet and mingle. It all culminates in a huge foldout that shows the entire interior. Noting, "There's no room left for me and my cat. / Something will have to be done about that!," Jill hies off to a distant hilltop and builds anew. Closing with a final popup of her new cottage, this colorful interactive romp, drenched in small detail, will keep young audiences entranced. (Picture book/novelty. 6-9)Read full book review >
SCRITCH SCRATCH by Miriam Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

Making a brave effort to pair hilarity with head lice, Moss and Durand (The Snoops, 1998) follow a tiny six-legger "no bigger than a freckle," as she (we know because she sports a pink bow) drops into a teacher's frizzy head and proceeds to sing a happy tune—"Oh . . . no one knows from where I came, / A nit, a nibbler with no name . . . "—as she deposits eggs on every hair. Soon the teacher is scratching; shortly thereafter, so is the entire class. Durand's cartoon illustrations are filled with small children and smaller insects (each with distinct personalities) going about their business with similar energy and good cheer. First the children are treated, but the plague isn't halted until children and teacher both are dosed with "special conditioner," and even then, sharp-eyed viewers may spot the tiny survivor peeking from a corner of the final spread. Parents may not find this all that amusing—but it is a painless way to bring up an unpleasant topic, and the accurate representation of how easily nits and lice spread will help children (and adults) understand the necessity of vigilance. (Picture book. 5-8)Read full book review >