Books by Don Freeman

THE CHALK BOX STORY by Don Freeman
by Don Freeman, illustrated by Don Freeman, developed by Auryn Inc.
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Nov. 30, 2012

"A quick but satisfying experience for budding artists in or recently out of diapers. (iPad storybook app. 2-4)"
Color by color, a box of fingertip-controlled pastel crayons draw an island, a stranded lad, a passing ship and other details in this animated version of Freeman's 1976 exercise in creativity. Read full book review >
ONE MORE ACORN by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

Still no more than a rough draft despite being buffed up by an editor, Freeman's son and a second illustrator, Jody Wheeler, this sketchy tale of a Washington, D.C., squirrel rooting through autumn leaves for acorns buried "last summer" should have stayed in the trunk. Read full book review >

EARL THE SQUIRREL by Don Freeman
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

From unnamed origins springs a wonderful, never-before-published book by Freeman, creator of Corduroy. Fans will recognize the distinctive scratchboard art style and amusing perspectives, all black-and-white here except for the bright red splash of a wool scarf. Read full book review >

MANUELO THE PLAYING MANTIS by Don Freeman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2004

This musically themed offering is from the estate of the late Freeman, with a few watercolor illustrations completed by another artist using Freeman's sketches. Read full book review >

GREGORY’S SHADOW by Don Freeman
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

Freeman's talents in Corduroy (1968) earned his beloved bear a permanent place on the shelf of favorite storytime characters. Read full book review >

A POCKET FOR CORDUROY by Don Freeman
Released: March 6, 1978

"Children who appreciate Corduroy—and know their way around a laundromat—will be acritically pleased, as they should be."
The overall-clad stuffed bear who in Corduroy (1968) was unmistakably in need of a shoulder-strap button is put in the position here of overhearing about pockets—the lack of which he hasn't noticed in the absence of a need. Read full book review >
THE CHALK BOX STORY by Don Freeman
Released: Oct. 30, 1976

"Thus the story grows on you, as you read it."
This nicely understressed demonstration of creativity in process begins with a box of colored chalk and a blank sheet of paper. Read full book review >
BEARYMORE by Don Freeman
Released: Oct. 18, 1976

"And nightshirt-clad Bearymore, dripping wet and grinning away after the sheer force of his idea has knocked him from the clothesline into a puddle, is a sight to applaud."
You'll like Bearymore, the unicycling circus bear, even though his problem—working up a new act before next season—is as old hat as the ringmaster says his performance is, and the not so novel solution, riding his unicycle on a tightrope, presents itself in a most contrived and unlikely manner: Waking from. his winter's sleep on a rainy April day, Bearymore notices his cycle hitched to the telephone/laundry pole, and so as not to get wet himself he travels across the clothesline to fetch it inside. Read full book review >
WILL'S QUILL by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 1, 1975

"Freeman bathes the encounter in a soft, affectionate glow that invites participation—but if this sentimental dolt can be proved to be William Shakespeare, Bacon's stock is sure to rise."
The idea of a country goose being buffeted about on the streets of London is probably as old as Freeman's "Mettle Olde England" setting, and the language of the young actor-playwright that Willoughby Waddle meets in the lane is downright hokey. Read full book review >
THE PAPER PARTY by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 1, 1974

"Visually, the Dinky Donks lack some of the sureness and polish that impress adults, but they do invite participation and an unprogrammed response."
When Jory climbs through his TV screen, past the bright lights and the Flik Flax cereal boxes to join his favorite video puppets, the Dinky Donks, everything in their world—snow, a giant birthday cake, a pet dog they give him—turns out to be made of paper. Read full book review >
THE SEAL AND THE SLICK by Don Freeman
Released: March 1, 1974

"A smoothed out, toned down ecology lesson for the very youngest — provided the message doesn't slide right over their heads."
The soft, romantic water color washes and sweetly childlike drawings of the seal and its young rescuers are inadequate for the technological tragedy which nearly drowns the seal incapacitated by an oil spill. Read full book review >
INSPECTOR PECKIT by Don Freeman
Released: Aug. 27, 1972

"Though it's not a case to inspire Maigret, this feathered Clouzot with his blase facade and bungling good intentions is nicely at home in the soft blue sketches of familiar Paris scenes."
Another of Mr. Freeman's pigeons flying high and low, a bereted and eager Peckit ("at your beck and call") flits from the rooftops of Paris, through the Luxembourg Gardens, to an awning at a sidewalk cafe — all in search of a little girl's lost knit bag. Read full book review >
HATTIE, THE BACKSTAGE BAT by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 8, 1970

"But then Pet of the Met was no masterpiece of plotting and look how that perseveres; probably a winsome, behatted bat casting a monstrous shadow across the stage will get her share of handclaps."
Hattie the backstage bat becomes the star of the show by first scaring everyone stiff. . . or by hook or by crook which is all this hangs on. Read full book review >
FOREVER LAUGHTER by Don Freeman
Released: March 30, 1970

"Funny enough if you'll settle for a story in facial expressions."
Most of the humor is in the unaccompanied pictures—and unaccompanied pictures are not the usual choice of children old enough to enjoy the joke. Read full book review >
Released: April 14, 1969

"Say horsing around."
Daydreaming, a little girl welcomes all manner of animals to the library but open-house becomes a madhouse when mice scurry in; then it's only thanks to the canary ("she's telling them it's time to go") that order is restored. Read full book review >
CORDUROY by Don Freeman
Released: March 1, 1968

"Corduroy and Lisa break the spell by talking to each other but otherwise it's the sort of predicament that children recognize, made more poignant by the plea in Corduroy's eyes."
A bear missing a button looks shopworn, so Corduroy sets out after the department store closes to find his. Read full book review >
THE GUARD MOUSE by Don Freeman
Released: March 1, 1967

"The sea change has softened Mr. Freeman's palette and sharpened his pen, and the result is jolly good."
Clyde, a conscientious mouse, wears the uniform of a guard at Buckingham Palace and patrols the small openings along the walls. Read full book review >
A RAINBOW OF MY OWN by Don Freeman
Released: March 20, 1966

"Especially well done is the coloring of the sky and landscape during the heavy thundershower, and the turbulence they suggest helps to balance the sweetness of the story for the boy returns home to find the rainbow in his room and the scenery becomes flooded with inspirational-looking sunbeams."
The little boy, all decked out in mackintosh, rain hat and boots, looks prepared for something tougher than this fragile fantasy about his search for a rainbow and the games he would play with it if he found it. Read full book review >
DANDELION by Don Freeman
illustrated by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 4, 1964

"The action of the words is shown in the pictures,- pleasant cartoons."
Here's a good natured example of why it's always best to be yourself. Read full book review >
THE TURTLE AND THE DOVE by Don Freeman
Released: March 9, 1964

"The book is a fine example of an artist at work without strong color."
The artist has created a distant world of misted ocean and island by using soft blue greens and greys in the clear, serene pictures. Mr. Freeman proves that he is equally at ease with words: the descriptions are terse and startling; the brief dialogue blends into the text. Read full book review >
BOTTS THE NAUGHTY OTTER by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 23, 1963

"But black and white pictures are cartoonish to an undesirable degree; Coldness pervades which leaves Botts a bug-eyed, characterless bundle of wet fur."
That happens when busy beavers drop their work and try to frolic like otters and one otter is forced to take over the tiring work of beavers could have tickled young onlookers. Read full book review >
SKI PUP by Don Freeman
illustrated by Don Freeman
Released: March 15, 1963

"EWSLUGp1957."
Hugo, a trained St. Read full book review >
MONKEYS ARE FUNNY THAT WAY by Dorothy Koch
Released: Sept. 15, 1962

"There is enough repetition, too, and yet enough incident, as the monkey almost gets caught only to escape again, to make it fun to read. Don Freeman's pictures in flat color and line help tell the story with action and humor.

"

A Beginning to Read Book with a vocabulary and a rhythm in the telling that helps the second grader to carry himself along. Read full book review >

COME AGAIN, PELICAN by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 1, 1961

"But the trick of the day is performed by the pelican, for as the tide rolls out and Ty walks back to his trailer, the delightful bird perched on a dune opens its mouth and returns to him the other boot."
Author and illustrator of many delightful books here presents one of the most lucid pictures of the ocean's tidal movements and their effect on one little fisherman. Read full book review >
CYRANO THE CROW by Don Freeman
Released: Aug. 15, 1960

"Don Freeman acknowledges the role television plays in the child's life and uses it as a device from which to spring his whimsical fantasy."
First there was Norman the Doorman, then the Space Witch and now Don Freeman conjures up another creature, Cyrano, as magical and beguiling as his predecessors. Read full book review >
SPACE WITCH by Don Freeman
Released: Aug. 24, 1959

"The demand for witches goes on."
Tilly Ipswitch, an up-to-date witch, sets off from earth with her cat to find a Halloween adventure on another planet; earth is so dull. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 1, 1959

"The author's bold black and yellow illustrations are particularly successful in the feeling of light and dark which they convey, and the experience of one night by candlelight should stack up to a real-life adventure in the mind of the young reader."
Thacher is a little boy with a problem. Read full book review >
NORMAN THE DOORMAN by Don Freeman
Released: April 10, 1959

"And the world of art lovers, exhibit openings, and mousedom, portrayed in Don Freeman's delicious pastels, will enchant children and delight the most sophisticated of parents."
Norman is a doorman. Read full book review >
FLY HIGH, FLY LOW by Don Freeman
Released: Aug. 19, 1957

"If it had not been for that friendly Chinese, Mr. Hi Lee, perhaps the happy reunion of the little family might never have occurred."
Sid and Midge were one of San Francisco's most devoted couples. Read full book review >
MOP TOP by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 9, 1955

"Firm stitching."
Not as good as Teddy Bear (1954) but nevertheless quite a funny picture- book delineating that reluctance toward the first trip to the barber shop. Read full book review >
BEADY BEAR by Don Freeman
Released: Sept. 3, 1954

"A happy comment on the overly adventurous, with especially humorous block prints by the author."
Beady's a rare toy bear owned by appreciative Thayer, but one night he's all wound up, gets his bearings and goes out to live in a cave. Read full book review >
PET OF THE MET by Lydia Freeman
Released: April 3, 1953

"In the nick of time Mefisto is bewitched, dances too, and cat and mouse become friends."
Backstage animal life at the Metropolitan Opera House, a little on the sentimental side but with lavish colored pencil drawings by the authors that have humor and provide a nice setting for a run through of "The Magic Flute" as part of the story. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1951

"We were not able to see the illustrations which are in full color, but the story contains enough happy nonsense to please, and there's a happy ending when Chuggy, the old engine, rescues a streamliner from a snow bank, and the lonely blue caboose is called to the colors once more."
An old-fashioned engine, a blue circus caboose, and a snowbound streamliner — all coupled together for a gay train tale. Read full book review >
COME ONE, COME ALL by Don Freeman
Released: Nov. 16, 1949

"Good fun."
This, on the other hand, is delightful light reading, and original sort of autobiography as well. Read full book review >
IT SHOULDN'T HAPPEN by Don Freeman
Released: July 19, 1945

"Insert some double meanings if you will — or turn the pages for sheer escape on dog days."
Full cycle — man into dog into man — as Private Bedlington is conditioned first by the issue of his dog tag, then by the barked command "Crawl" — and slowly discovers that he has taken on the externals of his name. Read full book review >